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Txt a Tip

Text-A-Tip is a secure source that can be used among all Chaparral High School students to reassure safety and a sense of protection. As student ID's are flipped over, Text-A-Tip is printed out boldly containing a number, website, and QR code. Once the QR code is scanned, it automatically pulls up the App Store. “Instead of you texting it, you just go into the app, and the app takes you through all these questions to help you answer your current situation,” said Dean Craig Bowman. The free app was created this year to guide students from any school to safety. Text-A-Tip is the Chaparral staff's biggest resource to solving any ongoing situation that needs to be taken care of. As soon as the text is sent, it immediately sends to the sheriff's office and is quickly forwarded to Chaparral. “We get texts all throughout the night… and don't hesitate to use them,” said Dean Kyle Mossman. Text-A-Tip is a 24 hour safe haven for all students.

By: Ashley Nesland

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Text It, Stop It

     As a high school student, stress and anxiety becomes part of the occupation. The strain of homework and grades overwhelms students. The pressure soon leads to poor decisions, decisions that affect some Chaparral kids everyday. Text-A-Tip was created in March 2009 to assure students that no one is alone in any situation. Phyllis Harvey, a Program Coordinator for the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, has been working with the Text-A-Tip program for 25 years. “We have saved the lives of 17 students who were having thoughts of suicide that we know of,” said Harvey.

     Having a tool that can save lives in a matter of minutes is a powerful thing. According to Harvey, the top three things people texted a tip about this school year was drugs, concern about a student, and open campus complaints. Text-A-Tip is used for more than just drugs and high school objections. “If students see...bullying or threatening to hurt themselves or others, they can now tell law enforcement and school officials about it immediately and anonymously using Text-a-Tip,” said Harvey. Keeping Chaparral and our peers safe is a task that students shouldn’t take lightly. Harvey reminds us of this with an important idea: “We are grateful that students are using the program responsibly to keep their schools and fellow students safe.”

By Allie Cummings

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Passing the Torch

Students await guided tours put on by Link Crew leaders. Photo by Kai Peterson

Students await guided tours put on by Link Crew leaders. Photo by Kai Peterson

     The winds begin to chill less as our school year progresses and we wave farewell to our seniors as they head off in their future endeavors and prepare our school for the most grand welcome we can muster to our eighth grade newcomers. On January 25th, 2016 Chaparral High School held an Eighth Grade Showcase to provide a welcoming image of the school for the incoming freshmen transitioning from middle school to high school. A plethora of classrooms all over the school were arranged to orientate the new high schoolers as to what they’ll be doing in their classes and what they can expect from their classroom experiences.


    These classrooms, the art room or the computer room for instance, laid out stimulating activities for the eighth graders with the company of honors students. In the art room, honor students and the new freshmen doodled all over the art room tables covered in butcher paper while, in the computer room, the high schoolers-to-be were taught about the wondrous world of graphic design and tech. Chaparral, as a school, showed the eighth graders what Chap has to offer and what they are in for in the following year as they make the great transition from junior high. The whole school is excited to welcome its new freshmen, and hopefully, will come together to give them the best first year of high school they could hope for.

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