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Canned Food Drive Recap

Boxes upon boxes filled with cans for the Parker Task Force. Photo by Erica Grotts

Boxes upon boxes filled with cans for the Parker Task Force. Photo by Erica Grotts

Every year Chaparral comes together to help out the Parker community with an abundance of cans. It’s a school wide contribution of canned foods and monetary donations that are taken to the Parker Task Force. Chaparral’s canned food started on October 23rd and went through November 3rd, which was a fantastic week and a half. The previous years of the canned food drive has been very successful and this year was no different. Chaparral junior and Student Government member Noah Gerwinat shared that “[his] favorite part was being a part of Student Government, getting to pack the cans into boxes everyday, and seeing the enormous numbers of cans that classes were able to bring in. It was very fun and rewarding to fill an entire box and stack it up on the pile of countless cans.” For the 2017-18 school year, 13,996 cans were raised for the Parker Task Force, and $2,135.05 was raised for the Chap Fam Fund. Another Student Government member, junior Chloe Croissant said “Overall as a school we really came together for a great cause and that is all we can ever ask for!” Every non-perishable food item raised along with items like diapers, deodorant, and feminine products goes to those in need in the community with the approaching holiday season and Chaparral stepped up to deliver. Student body president and Student Government member Ally Swain said “[she] expects Chaparral to be as giving as it possibly can be so whatever the outcome it will be amazing.” If every year the amount of cans and money raised by Chaparral students continues to go up, there will be more people touched and families taken care of. Overall this was a great turnout for the canned food drive, with Chaparral being a part of something much bigger.

Story by Devon Williams and Erica Grotts

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Concert Season

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The empty amphitheater that holds thousands of people. Photo by Devon Williams

As the seasons start to change, the concerts and events at Red Rocks Amphitheatre come to an end. This is a very upsetting ending for people who attend multiple concerts at Red Rocks throughout the year. Red Rocks will be a place to hike and to workout until the sun comes back out again. With only two more concerts left, if you have never been to a concert or event at Red Rocks, you wouldn’t know that it is one of the most amazing venues. The rocks are to the left and right of you, and if you stand to look at the stage, a view of the city lights is behind the artist performing right in the middle. When asked about her favorite part as well as the most outstanding thing about the venue, senior Taylor Whitrock said “[her] favorite part about Red Rocks was definitely watching Russ get so emotional about his fans, and he was so moved by the crowd. Also how many people were there, the fact that it was outside and the rocks. It made everything sound so much louder and bigger than just being in the normal Pepsi Center.” This is extremely different than venues such as the Pepsi Center or the Ogden where a bad seat could mean a bad viewing of the concert as well as the sound bouncing off the rocks. At Red Rocks, each seat has an unobscured viewing of the artist making Red Rocks very unique. Red Rocks was opened on June 15, 1941 and can sit 9,525 people. About a week ago, hip hop artist Russ performed at Red Rocks. Russ had started with a very small fan base and it has only grown from his start. Russ tweeted “I started out at 600 ppl in Denver last summer, then 1,100 a couple months later, then 3,600 this past summer, then 10k last night. Build.” Red Rocks is a crazy place to perform for most artists due to the location. The concerts ending will be back soon, but you’re still able to go check out Red Rocks with a small hike.

Story by Devon Williams

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Chaparral's Global Footprint

Photo by Hannah Lee

Photo by Hannah Lee

How many water bottles do you drink a day? What about in a week? A month?

The amount of plastic that is produced to meet the demands of people in North America alone is staggering. According to the Container Recycling Institute, Americans consume water from plastic bottles at a rate that demands more than 70 million bottles every day. Also according to the Container Recycling Institute, in 2014, 100.7 billion bottles were sold in the United States. That’s around 315 bottles per person. Thinking more locally, according to these statistics, that means Chaparral students consume nearly 630,000 bottles a year. The amount of plastic we put to use is becoming a crisis in itself, not only for the oceans and landfills that are becoming covered in never-ending heaps of plastic, but for the way that we conserve water as well. Building Manager Jose Suarez says that administration is taking necessary steps to assure that we have the newest equipment possible to minimize the waste of water at Chaparral, for both financial and environmental purposes. “Admin takes steps every year to make sure that we are moving forward and replacing all of the equipment and hardware we can to save as much water as possible. We’re always making progress,” Suarez says.

Chaparral is obviously taking steps to conserve water where it’s obvious, but the way students as well as teachers purchase plastic beverage bottles is counter intuitive to these actions. According to the Plastic Oceans Foundation, “The process of producing bottled water requires around 6 times as much water per bottle as there is in the container.” Not only are the bottles piling up, but they are wasting water in their own surprising way. There are several ways to fight against the mass production of plastic, but one of the most powerful is to simply stop buying it. Students of Chaparral as well as youth everywhere should care deeply about this plastic epidemic, as it is our world that we are destroying. Buyers and the demand of a product have a significant impact on the supplier’s ability to produce it. In other words, if we stop buying bottled beverages, they will be forced to stop creating them. Consumers must think of every purchase they make as a vote toward the world they want to live in. If plastic is ‘voted’ against so to speak, the materials we rely on will have to be rethought, which is what this world desperately needs. If every individual has the power to make change with something as simple as a purchase, humans have no excuse to let plastic consume our Earth whole. We only have one planet, there is no back up, and we must start acting like it.

Story by Alex Merrill

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SSN- Making a Difference

Autumn-in-a-Jars being sold by SSN students and teachers. Photo by Ava Houghton

Autumn-in-a-Jars being sold by SSN students and teachers. Photo by Ava Houghton

The SSN Program, which stands for the Significant or Severe Needs program at Chaparral High School focuses on teaching students individualized ways to succeed in and past their high school careers. As this program can be highly demanding, sometimes money from the district can’t pay for everything they need in order to build their education on real life skills and communication. By the security office, the SSN team and students  will be selling baked goods for one dollar, large glitter stress jars for five dollars, one dollar stress balls, orbeez stress balls for two dollars, five dollar Chaparral paw print stickers, Chaparral t-shirts for thirty dollars, and lastly “autumn-in-a-jar” spice for five dollars. SSN teacher Kimberly Laterza has worked extremely hard in order to make this fundraiser fun, successful, and educational for the sellers and the buyers. “Not only are we raising money to support our community outings, cooking initiatives, and an end of the year SSN party, our students are taking ownership of their own program by coming up with products to sell, ways to market, and money management,“ stated Laterza. As learning is a large part of this fundraiser, it is also very important to see the smiling faces on the students as they continue to sell what they worked exceptionally hard to make. Mrs. Laterza said that her favorite thing about this annual fundraiser is “seeing the sense of pride and accomplishment on all of [her] kiddo’s faces.” By purchasing something at this fundraiser, the students will have learned more about finance, while communicating with more peers and teachers. “With your support and generosity, you are providing our students with real life experiences and a sense of pride and accomplishment,” said Laterza. They will be selling all day October 27th during class periods and passing periods.

Story by Ava Houghton

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Fall Break Adventures

Joey Ulrich and his family enjoying the view in Venice. Photo by Joey Ulrich.

Joey Ulrich and his family enjoying the view in Venice. Photo by Joey Ulrich.

It is officially October, which means that many students in the Chaparral student body were anxiously awaiting fall break, which took place starting October 7th, and ended on October 16th. Although the break was only nine days long, it gave students the opportunity to pursue adventures that they couldn’t pursue while school is in session. These adventures range from extravagant getaways overseas to just relaxing within the Colorado borders. Juniors Katie Hogan, Sam Schabbing,and Joey Ulrich are just three of the Chap students who made fall break 2017 one to remember. Katie Hogan’s typical school day consists of an assortment of AP courses, club-based classes, and involvement in extracurricular athletics. Hogan, much like the average high school student, tends to have loads of accumulated homework after each school day, so a one week break is often well needed. During her nine days off, Hogan took a vacation to Phoenix, Arizona with her family. “My family and I usually go to Phoenix over fall break to get away from the colder weather, and because it’s less busy in Phoenix now than it is in spring break,” explained Hogan about her tradition of traveling to Arizona at this time of year. Although Arizona is the perfect place to soak up the sun and relax by the pool, Hogan and her family made the trip productive by participating in a college tour. “We toured Arizona State University so that I could get a look at a school down there, but we mostly just hung out by the pool,” said Hogan. On her trip, Hogan also celebrated her 17th birthday by sleeping in and hanging out by the pool. Even though her venture was only one week long, junior Katie Hogan made the best of her fall break by unwinding and destressing in preparation of the upcoming quarter. Junior Sam Schabbing sat back, relaxed, and enjoyed her fall break here in colorful Colorado. “Some friends and I went up to CU Boulder to visit my brother in college,” said Schabbing. Apart from her spontaneous trip to Boulder, Schabbing got to enjoy the rest of her break with her best friends. “Sometimes it’s good to cherish some quality time with your best friends, getting to forget about school and be with my friends was much needed,” claimed Schabbing. Although she didn’t go across the globe, junior Sam Schabbing made this fall break well worth her time. Junior Joey Ulrich left all his school problems here in the United States while he traveled all around Italy with his family. “We went to Munich, Salzburg, Venice, and Rome,” said Ulrich. Although any part of those cities would be amazing to see, there were definitely highlights to Ulrich’s trip. “Seeing the Roman ruins (the Colosseum and the Forum), taking a boat around Venice, seeing the inside of the Sistine Chapel, and touring the concentration camp Dachau were all major high points of the trip,” stated Ulrich. Of course those major and extravagant adventures were highlights, but the little memories like “wandering around the narrow streets of Venice trying to find our way around” were some of Ulrich’s favorite as well. Not only did they go on this trip to escape school for a week, but they also went because his sister senior Abby Ulrich is going to college next year and their parents wanted to take them on a trip to Europe to spend time together and to experience a culture that’s different than the US. “When you travel to a different country you are completely surrounded by that culture. Not everyone speaks your language or dresses the same way so you have to adapt a bit. For example, there was plenty of times where we had a hard time communicating with our waiter in a restaurant because they didn’t speak English very well. We also got to see plenty of other things like how late or early they are awake, and what clothing they wear,” explained Ulrich. Over the much too short nine day break, junior Joey Ulrich and his family took full advantage of it with their time in Italy. Whether it is a short weekend getaway to a college town or a trip to explore overseas, students like juniors Katie Hogan, Sam Schabbing, and Joey Ulrich are 3 wolverines that took advantage of their week off in their own different ways.

Story by Hannah Wankel and Terra Koontz

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What's the deal with Homeroom?

 

It is the start of a brand new year, and students are settling into school routines and gearing up for all of the amazing opportunities that the 2017-2018 school year has to offer. As the first quarter of school is coming to a close, it has become obvious that administration and teachers have been making changes to school policies to make Chap a better place. The changes that have sparked the most debate are ones that lie around the homeroom bell schedule and policy. In previous years, the school has allowed a “mass call-out” type policy, where parents called their students out of homeroom for the entire year. This year, however, that policy has come to an end. Chaparral now requires students to be in homeroom as a mandatory part of their weekly schedule, to count towards their time in the classroom. Not only that, but the bell schedule for homeroom has been changed as well. There is now a bell when homeroom officially starts at 8:20, another bell five minutes after at 8:25, a bell 5 minutes before homeroom ends, and yet another when it is officially over at 9:09. Mrs. Cherry in the office assures us that there is definitely reasoning behind the bells, and it makes sense. “What the travel bells do is give teachers a clear indication that the halls should be clear. They make sure that everyone is more on task and accountable for where they’re at, and makes sure that students have valid reasons to travel.” Students at Chaparral can surely attest to the fact that traffic in the halls can get hectic, and having miscellaneous kids in the hall for no real reason would certainly complicate things for teachers trying to get everyone safely to their classes. “We had this bell system for homeroom several years ago”, Mrs. Cherry added, “the system proved successful then because it helped keep students on track and keep halls more clear.” Other teachers in the building believe in the system as well. Mrs. Martin, a math teacher, has experienced homeroom classes first hand and believes that this system is the best way to help our Wolverines succeed academically and socially, and also increase the safety of the building. “I have always had a sign out sheet because I like to know where kids are when they leave my classroom. I know that passes have been given to kids that aren't being used responsibly, students will say they are going to a teacher and instead, leave campus. With the bell schedule as it is now, it makes it very difficult for kids to leave campus and make it back on time for the next bell. This holds kids accountable for their actions, and discourages leaving campus at all during homeroom. It is also important for parents to know where their kids are for safety purposes and in case of any emergency.” Mrs. Martin understands that homeroom is a vital opportunity for all students at Chap, whether they are freshmen or seniors. According to Mrs. Martin, many of the students who were supposed to be in her homeroom opted out last year. “I had two thirds of my homeroom class called out for the entire year last year. The majority of students that were called out were below a C or failing in at least one class. Homeroom is a huge opportunity to not only get help, but also help others and meet people. It is one of the few times here at Chap where all grades can be integrated, helping kids meet people that they wouldn’t have otherwise.” The social aspect of homeroom is often neglected when considering pros of going. It is an important time of the week where, regardless of age and grade, people can bond and form relationships. It is also an amazing tool to help suffering grades. Having that time scheduled to talk with any teacher in the building can be incredibly valuable to get help on difficult assignments and study for tests. Ms.Polak is another teacher in the building who stands behind the new homeroom policy for good reasons. “The way that homeroom is set up this year is really helpful for teachers,” she says, “now I can use the first five minutes of class to take attendance calmly without being overloaded with travel passes, and still be able to let everyone go where they need to be after attendance is in place. It makes it a lot less frantic and more organized, and everyone wins in the end.” Ms. Polak is just one of the countless teachers that have faith in the new system, with her student’s best interest in mind. Homeroom is a highly underrated part of Chap’s schedule, that is purposely built in to help students reach their highest potential academically and socially. The new system may take some getting used to, but overall, it seems like a dependable way to encourage Wolverines, which is what Chaparral is all about.

Story by Alex Merrill

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AP Chinese Language

Students practicing writing the Chinese symbols. Photo by Matthew McCarthy 

Students practicing writing the Chinese symbols. Photo by Matthew McCarthy 

Imagine a class with only two students in it. Of the 2,500 students at Chaparral, only 2 of them are taking AP Chinese Language this year. That means only 0.0008% of Chaparral students are taking AP Chinese Language this year. This class is only reserved for the best Chinese students. During the 2017-2018 school year, Jan Qiong will be teaching AP Chinese Language and Chinese 1 in a combined class in 408U and 409U during first period. The AP students take an AP Test at the end of the year. The test has sections that include a listening, speaking, reading, and writing part. “The test is pretty hard, usually the students who take AP Chinese have to put twice the effort of kids who take other languages,” said Qiong. Chinese is very different than other languages offered at Chaparral because it doesn't have as much grammar; instead Chinese is written in characters or pictures. This can make the class both more difficult, and more interesting. Students have to memorizes both what the character looks like, how to write it, and how to pronounce it. Students are challenged to learn what a picture sounds like, which is difficult. “I use TPRS to teach the students, which is Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling. They learn to read and speak stories, and learn through the stories and reading instead of memorizing grammar. I like to create a story with the students,” explained Qiong. During the year in AP Chinese Language, the students do a various selection of different activities throughout the class. Foreign exchange students travel to Chaparral from China. The foreign students get the opportunity to travel with the class to various locations plotted all around Colorado. The AP students also work on a project of their choice related to Chinese culture and Chinese language. They are in Chinese National Honor Society and do projects for the National Honor Society while preparing for the AP test throughout the year. The AP students also help the Chinese 1 students in their class and sometimes present projects about Chinese culture and language to them. AP Chinese is both an interesting and challenging class that few students at Chaparral take and few know exists.

 

 

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Kickoff to Unified Flag Football

A Unified player practicing before the game starts. Photo by Ava Houghton

A Unified player practicing before the game starts. Photo by Ava Houghton

Unified Sports has had a large influence on special needs athletes and peers within Chaparral and the community. Throughout the years, they have started up Unified basketball and Unified soccer, but with this new school year comes a new sport: flag football. Chaparral, along with Legend, Thunderidge, and Douglas County High School are participating in a trial season of Unified Flag Football. Coaches Lisa Olofson and Lori Pace have taken this challenge by the horns and quickly pioneered this new sport. Thursday, September 21st, Chaparral players and peers competed against Legend to not only win, but to figure out how the rules need to be regulated. With a competitive spark in every player Olofson knew that this sport would be fun for the players, as well as the peers. “Offering Unified flag football to our school is a wonderful opportunity for our Unified athletes to participate in and be an active part of our Chaparral Family. Our Unified Sports program develops friendships and brings athletes, peers, and our community together,” stated Olofson. They have started this program to offer another sport, which offers more competition for those who want to challenge themselves. They want the athletes to focus on their individual skills by noticing the no running zones and working on their throwing and running. Peer coach Jenna York has worked in the special needs program at Chaparral for two years and since then has become an active peer coach in all of the unified sports. “I think Unified flag football is a good addition because it allows athletes to use different learning techniques because they do have to understand plays and learn how to work as a team,” said York. As this is a well known program, Unified doesn’t get all of the attention it deserves. “Students can help out by coming to the games. The athletes love when their classmates show up to the games and support them. When there is a crowd of fans, it’s a big deal. Students can also tell them how good they did at a game or ask them if they are excited for their next game. It definitely boosts their confidence and makes them so happy,” explained York. Since this is the “trial” season, there are only two more games left. On Tuesday, October 3rd they will be competing away against Douglas County High School at 6 PM and the last game on Monday, October 16 will be at home at 6 PM against ThunderRidge High School. Come and support the Chaparral Unified players on these dates to have fun with friends and to bring awareness to the growing Unified Program.

Story by Ava Houghton

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Welcome to the '90s

Space buns can be the statement piece to push any simple outfit over the top. Picture of freshmen Maggie Weeks taken by Paige Wiebelhaus.

Space buns can be the statement piece to push any simple outfit over the top. Picture of freshmen Maggie Weeks taken by Paige Wiebelhaus.

Fashion is constantly changing with new trends being created every day. With trends like velvet, overalls, scrunchies, crop tops, plaid and everything jean; we see little hints of the ‘90s coming back full swing. Many people are all for the recycled trends and fully embrace it. Others are not so fond of it. Many teachers who lived through the original trends are all for the fashion tributes. “I love all the makeup and clothing trends because they are added ways to express yourself which I think is very cool that we have to ability to do that,” photography teacher Laura Sierra said. Many of the trends are widely favored. However, some of them are not too popular. Depending on the place and time, Sierra feels like many of the trends are not appropriate. “The idea that you have to pay $200 for a pair of distressed jeans is kind of ridiculous to me,” Sierra expressed. “There are some that are way too ripped that I see at school which I feel is not appropriate. They should be worn to concerts or something,” she said. Many of the other trends are said to be over done. Some of these trends are the fully ripped jeans completed with gaping holes on the front and back along with full velvet outfits. “Small amounts of velvet like a velvet shirt or velvet booties are adorable but velvet head to toe is way too much,” Sierra explained. Throughout the students of Chaparral, there is a wide spread of opinions about the trends as well. Some fully approve of the returning trends, while others could care less. Senior Sydney Townsley is all for it. “I think it's cool to see things go out of style and have them come back some odd years later,” Townsley said. “Some of my favorite ‘90s trends are ripped jeans, overalls, and off the shoulder tops,” she shared. However, on the flip side, junior Reagan Davis doesn't partake in the trends and finds them overdone. “I think the hype about ‘90s fashion is a little overrated, people go overboard sometimes,” Davis claimed. Many of the trends we see today are popular among the youth of Chaparral high school, but some are more popular than others. Overalls, ripped jeans, and crop tops are a few of the top choices. Some of the trends were extremely popular at first, but have since died down. Chokers, for example, have slowly started to disappear from modern day fashion and drifted back to their original era. All things ‘90s have seemed to slip their way back into modern trend, some more prominent than others, but this may foresee a pattern of recurring fashion in different decades. Fashion is a way to express yourself no matter what era it's from.

By Paige Wiebelhaus

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Time to Dispel with Final Farewells

On Friday, May 12th, freshmen, sophomores, and juniors poured into the gym after 3rd period ready for a much needed break halfway through the day. However, this time the assembly wasn’t to get ready for another dance or big rivalry game, but instead a chance to bid a final farewell to the graduating senior class of 2017.

The seniors already crowded their section preparing themselves for a wrap on their 4 year high school journey filled with lasting friendships, amazing memories, tremendous growth, and way too much homework. Finishing the last day of high school with one last assembly is one pretty good way to say goodbye.

The celebration extended past the 2017 class to all of the teachers saying goodbye to Chap as well. Fan favorite, Mark Stevens, was the highlight of a video with students sharing fond memories and wishing luck upon their favorite teachers. And of course, time for fun was made with teachers competing against seniors in a tricycle race to give the 2017 class one last assembly victory. Principal, Greg Gotchey, gave his speech to the graduating seniors wishing them luck along their future journey, reminding them to never forget they always have a home at Chaparral, and getting them even more excited for graduation on the Wednesday, May 17.

Now the rest of the classes finally got some time in the spotlight. Students quickly rushed along the gym to fill in their new class sections in the bleachers for the next year. The assembly finished out and regained focus back on the seniors with the teacher tunnel. Seniors walked through the gym seeing their teachers and favorite mentors for the last time, exchanging hugs, memories, and quite a few tears. The new sophomore, junior, and senior classes funneled out of the gym as quickly as they came. The graduating class of 2017 enjoyed the rest of their final day of high school with a BBQ packed with games, food, and fun on a beautiful sunny day.

By: Matt Fast

Students and teachers embrace saying their final goodbyes at the senior assembly. Photo by Matt Fast

Students and teachers embrace saying their final goodbyes at the senior assembly. Photo by Matt Fast

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It's Burrito Time

Your Average High Schooler Eating the Famous Cafeteria Burritos

Your Average High Schooler Eating the Famous Cafeteria Burritos

The bell rings at 8:33 A.M on another typical tame, tedious, and tiresome Monday morning. John, narrowly making it to class on time takes his hard, and lifeless seat. John is your average high schooler: 16 years old, a Junior, and barely keeping his mediocre-at-best GPA up to community college acceptable standards due to endless hours of procrastination. Not even having an off period during first and an extra hour of sleep can help save the doomed wreck of Monday. In the front of the classroom Mrs. Chavez drones on about conjugating imperfect verbs. All words that John does not understand in the slightest way, shape, or form. At this point in the year John has subconsciously learned how to block all of his teachers out, with half of his brain still sleeping and the other half in an even deeper sleep. No escape out of the lifeless lesson. John reaches into his pocket and finds $3.00 on the dot stuffed into the corner of his pocket. Exactly enough money to buy a burrito. John shoots his hand into the air and asks to use the restroom. John, nearly sprinting down the halls, knows this may be the only satisfying thing that happens to him all day, and he plans to savor every last bite. After what seems like an eternity John reaches the lunchroom and finds the lunch lady setting out a tray of newly heated burritos. What an American hero. There has never been a more beautiful sight at 8:35 in the morning than rows of shiny, tinfoil wrapped bacon, egg, and cheese burritos sitting on a silver tray. John sheds a tear as he tears into the perfect creation and triumphantly strolls back to the 400’s. Maybe Monday isn’t so bad after all.

Ever since the first day those piping hot, tin foil wrapped pieces of heaven in a tortilla were served, students around the school have wondered what makes the burritos so good? Just what is the secret ingredient to crafting the world’s 8th wonder. Could it be love? Or is it the Krabby Patty secret formula? Just what is the lunch room staff hiding from the student body?

“I think that the reason they’re so popular is because they’re quite big and very tasty. And of course the secret ingredient is lots of love”, said cafeteria worker Karen Cruz.

By: Matthew Fast

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Hit the Trail

St. Mary's Glacier 

St. Mary's Glacier 

With an entire summer ahead to explore the beauty of Colorado, these are a few of the many gorgeous places that you don’t want to miss out on! Both close and far from home- all are definitely worthwhile.

 

  1. Castlewood Canyon-  

Features: 4 miles, Canyon Dam

Level: Easy to moderate

2989 Colorado 83, Franktown, CO 80116

 

  1. St. Mary’s Glacier-

Features: 1.4 miles, snow-capped year-round

Level: Intermediate

Arapaho National Forest, 7599 Fall River Rd, Idaho Springs, CO 80452

 

  1. Mount Elbert Peak-

Features: Highest peak in Colorado

Level: intermediate

High point of Lake County and the State of Colorado, U.S.

 

  1. Blue Lakes Trail-

Features: 8.6 miles, 3 stunning blue lakes, lush wildflowers

Level: difficult

Telluride, CO 81435

By: Megan Mondragon

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Underclassmen Scholarships

Avery Muniz Ready for her Future

Avery Muniz Ready for her Future

The four years that everybody spends in high school, can be some of the most important ones. The grades and reputations students set for themselves can greatly impact their future. We all hear stories about sport based scholarships, however, merit scholarships are an immense deal as well. All scholarships are a big accomplishment and should be recognized. Chaparral senior Avery Muniz is one of the students that has earned a merit scholarship. She has received a full ride scholarship for low income, high achieving students to Stanford. Muniz acquired it through the QuestBridge organization. It covers everything including supplies and traveling. QuestBridge matches students with any of it’s 38 schools if those schools accept the student.

The process for scholarships can be different for everybody. “I had to first apply for the QuestBridge Scholarship and provide financial and academic information. Once I was selected as a finalist, I got to rank which of its partner schools I wanted to go to and then apply to each of those schools separately. Since Stanford was my first choice and they accepted me, that was the school I matched to,” said Muniz.

When waiting to see if a scholarship has been offered, that single letter or email can affect someone’s life and career forever. “ When I found out I got the scholarship I immediately screamed and started sobbing in the middle of class, which was pretty unexpected because I’m usually really quiet in class and I was definitely expecting a rejection,” said Muniz. Not only was Muniz will be thrilled to know that she received this opportunity, her family was as, if not even more excited. “ My mom was extremely excited. She brought me balloons and chocolate and flowers and took me out to dinner. She was also crying. She told every single person she’s ever come in contact with in her life,” explained Muniz.

College is the next step after high school. It’s a time to make memories and also help people realize what they want to do in life, what their calling is and more. Applying to colleges can be one of the more stressful things in life, and it takes lots of motivation and passion to impress them. Being accepted into college is a big accomplishment but earning a scholarship to one of the best colleges in the country is even bigger.

By: Emerald Herman

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Peanut Butter Cookies

Peanut Butter Cookie Ingredients 

Peanut Butter Cookie Ingredients 

Ingredients:

2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 cup peanut butter

3/4 cup butter

3/4 cup granulated sugar

3/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar

2 large eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

 

Recipe:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. In small bowl, combine flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt; mix well.

3. In large bowl, beat together the peanut butter and butter with (preferably) an electric mixer until smooth. Beat in granulated and brown sugars, eggs and vanilla until blended smoothly and evenly. Beat in flour mixture just until blended. (Refrigerate dough until easy to handle, if needed. This is a suggestion, but not necessary. It is up to personal preference.)

4. Shape dough into the preferable size wanted and arrange them onto ungreased baking sheets. If you’d like, you may flatten the cookie and add a crisscross pattern with a fork.

5. Bake the cookies for 12 minutes or until lightly golden (up to your preference). Let the fresh cookies cool on a wire rack and enjoy! :)

By: Ally Clinard

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Shoes to Fill

Abigail Houghton Getting Ready for Next Year

Abigail Houghton Getting Ready for Next Year

Seniors are seen as the top dogs of the school. They rule the halls and seem to have everything in order. Underclassman, on the other hand, are just trying to figure out what they're doing with their lives and how they are going to maintain a steady GPA and keep a social life. As the seniors prepare for their life ahead, freshman and sophomores will spend their time on summer homework. This transition means that next year there will be new seniors, juniors, and so on. The year ahead for upcoming juniors will be full of studying and testing and seniors will finally be able to get the relaxation they deserve. While the freshmen and sophomores will be trying oh-so-desperately not to slack off.

    Another struggle that comes along with graduation is the fear of losing the ones we’re close to. Freshman Kara Allen has made new friends that are seniors, however with the upcoming year, most of her friends are leaving for college. “I’m really upset that my senior friends are leaving, but i’m excited that they get to start the next part of their lives,” stated Allen.

    Current junior Erica Faughn is ready for her senior year to arrive. “Next year I’m most excited to be a senior. I feel like I’ve been waiting such a long time to be one and it’s crazy that I finally will become one,” said Faughn. However, Faughn is also “nervous to start applying to colleges and to start planning the next chapter of [her] life.”

   As the 2016-17 school year is coming to an end the excitement for moving into the next grade is building up, and even though stress will be associated with this growth, all it means is that you’re one step closer to graduating.

By: Ava Houghton

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Cupcakes for the Holidays

Cupcakes on Easter Day

Cupcakes on Easter Day

Ingredients

For the cupcakes

  • 120g/4oz plain flour

  • 140g/5oz caster sugar

  • 1 tsp baking powder

  • 40g/1½oz unsalted butter

  • 50g/2oz dark chocolate, melted and cooled slightly

  • 1 free-range egg

  • 125ml/4fl oz milk

  • 1 orange, juice only

  • 3 tbsp granulated sugar

 

For the white chocolate and orange buttercream

  • 125g/4½oz unsalted butter, softened

  • 250g/9oz icing sugar

  • 2-3 tbsp milk

  • 50g/1¾oz white chocolate, melted

  • 1 orange, zest only

  • 100g/3½oz orange chocolate

 

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 170C/325F/Gas 3. Line a 12-hole muffin tin with paper cases.

  2. Mix the flour, sugar and baking powder together in a food processor. Add the butter and pulse until combined.

  3. Whisk the melted chocolate, egg and milk together in a jug.

  4. Stir the chocolate mixture into the flour mixture until just combined.

  5. Spoon the mixture into the cases and bake for 15-20 minutes, or until risen and golden-brown and a skewer inserted into the middle comes out clean. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool for 10 minutes.

  6. Meanwhile, mix the orange juice and granulated sugar together in a bowl. Carefully pour the orange juice mixture over the warm cakes and set aside to cool completely.

  7. For the white chocolate and orange buttercream, beat the butter in a bowl until light and fluffy. Carefully stir in the icing sugar and continue to beat for five minutes. Beat in the milk, melted chocolate and orange zest.

  8. Decorate the cupcakes with the buttercream

  9. Use a sharp knife to make chocolate shavings from the orange chocolate and use them to decorate the cupcakes.

By: Shayanna Spader and Olivia Goodman

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The Power of One

Mr. St Louis Collaborating with Fellow Counselor 

Mr. St Louis Collaborating with Fellow Counselor 

Issues and problems pop up in everybody’s life no matter their age. Eventually they get through it and it takes more than just that one person to do so. Our friends, classmates, teachers and counselors can help us get through all kinds of problems. Chaparral is known for our incredible idea of the ‘Chap Fam.’ Many students and teachers agree that it’s an amazing thing. Counselor, Tom St. Louis loves the idea of us being a family and so passionate with our school. “ I love the energy I get from being around you guys. There’s so much  more energy in this job because of high school aged kids that are doing exciting things and they have great plans and ambitions and I just want to be a part of that energy,” Said St. Louis.

The teachers and staff members all have a reason and drive that lead them to do what they do. “Columbine made me want to be a counselor. I was at my parents house that day, and I was close enough to hear what was going on and I saw emergency vehicles, emergency equipment and everybody responding to help and the aftermath of it made me really want to help. So I decided to do this for a living and help young people.” explained St. Louis.

Chaparral is known for being a special place because of the students, staff, teachers and the attitudes and this can sometimes bring in new members of the Chap Fam. St. Louis explained, “ I came to Chaparral because I was friends with Mary Johnson and when a job opened at Chaparral she called me and asked me if I’d be interested. I always heard good things about Chap. Chap had a good reputation outside of the area here so I already knew about the school and I was just excited to try to become a part of that school.” St. Louis has been a counselor for 17 years and loves what he does and will continue being a crucial part of the Chap Family.

By: Emerald Herman

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Young Minds Big Dreams

Nick Kounkel and Jack Dewolf showing off their shirts

Nick Kounkel and Jack Dewolf showing off their shirts

The business world being as competitive as it is, can be hard to prosper in. Young entrepreneurs, sophomores Jack Dewolf and Nick Kounkel have come extremely far in the business world at a young age. Dewolf got into business at the age of seven. “The first interaction with the business world I had was when I joined a t-shirt selling contest at the local pool. After that I just have always wanted to be part of it. Ever since then I’ve wanted to sell. It’s more like a game than anything,” said Dewolf. Now, the two have come together to form their own company.

TuckCOL has become a widely known brand throughout not only Chaparral and the local community, but throughout the state of Colorado and other states. “Eventually, we have hopes to become an international company so that not only people in the United States can enjoy our products but people in other countries can, too.” TuckCOL was founded in the summer of 2015. The name TuckCOL comes from Tucker Mountain in Colorado and the COL is an abbreviation for Colorado. “To start our company we began by securing a manufacturer. From there we wanted to figure out how we could take our manufactory and make it automatic. Then we built a website,” Dewolf stated. Kounkel went on to say, “It was really hard to find a manufacturer but after a lot of hard work and dedication everything came together and we  began being able to sell our clothing and other products. ”

Not only do the two prosper in their company, but they also prosper in creating relationships with each other and their closest customers. Junior Kevin Patterson said “I really enjoy Nick and Jack’s work. I think they do a good job of creating things not only things they like but things other people enjoy too.” “I really enjoy working with [Dewolf]. He's a really good business partner. It’s really easy for us to work together and come up with good ideas. We work well together since we’ve been friends for so long,” said Kounkel.  Dewolf, as well, enjoys working with Kounkel. “I love working with him. We work really well together and both have the same visions for our company,” said Dewolf.  “Our company is built around our passion for snowboarding and the outdoors. We focus on making our products the best fit for what we do everyday. We sell versatile apparel that is ready for anything from a ten day backpacking trip to a casual day downtown.”

By: Jazmyn Andre

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More Savings More Adventures

Denver Art Museum 

Denver Art Museum 

Traveling is an expensive luxury people can only experience once or twice a year. Or is it? Is traveling really so expensive and  luxurious. There are many ways to save money for travel, and these tips can easily all be used at the same time. The best way to start saving for travel is to figure out how much money is being spent every month, and what the money is being spent on. Starting a dedicated travel fund easily allows one to move money every month towards travel, and see how much they have saved. This will allow an easy way to cut spending on unnecessary purchases and immediately start saving money.

A key part of saving money for travel is sticking to a budget. This will be hard at times, especially seeing friends hang out Friday nights and current financial troubles get in the way. An easy way to stop spending money is to not have time to spend it in the first place. Picking up extra hours at work, or finding a second part time job, will earn more money towards travel, and give less time to spend money. Getting rid of cable and stopping from eating out, can save hundreds of dollars alone. By not buying expensive food, over priced bills are no longer an issue. Cooking food at home is both a cheaper, and more healthy option to save money and stay healthy while planning travel.

When planning on traveling for a long time, one month or longer,  selling an apartment, house, and/ or car, can provide lots of extra money to spend. A great way to save money while planning a trip is to use a credit card that can earn miles for flights. This will help later on when miles can be used for free/discounted flights. But, the best way to start saving for travel is to start early, and stick to a set budget. Set yourself a goal and work towards it every day. Eventually, you'll have the money to make your dream trip become a reality.

By: Matthew McCarthy

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Zesty Lemon Bars

Tasty lemon bars baked to perfection

Tasty lemon bars baked to perfection

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of cold butter

  • ½ cup powdered sugar

  • 2 cups of flour

  • 4 eggs

  • 2 cups of sugar

  • ¼ cup flour

  • 6 T lemon juice

  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest

**Makes about 2 dozen, depending on the size of the squares cut.

 

Baking Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350℉

  2. Get out a 13x9” pan and cover the inside with aluminum foil, allowing for 2 inches excess foil off each handle of the pan. Lightly grease the foil.

  3. Mix the 2 cups of flour and the ½ cup of powdered sugar together and beat in the cold butter until it is crumbly.

  4. Press out the crust evenly into the pan and bake for 20-25 minutes

  5. In one bowl, beat the 4 eggs until they are smooth. Add the 2 cups of sugar, 1 teaspoon lemon zest, and the 6 T of lemon juice. Mix that together.

  6. In a separate bowl, mix together ¼ cup of flour and 1 teaspoon of baking soda.

  7. Add that mixture to the bowl with the eggs, mix it well, then pour it evenly over the baked crust.

  8. Put that in the oven for 25 minutes or until the filling is baked to your preference.

  9. When that is cooked to your liking, take it out of the oven and leave it in the pan for about 15 minutes. After, take the lemon bars out of the pan, but remaining in the aluminum foil and let that cool for about 15 more minutes.

  10. When cooled, cut the dish into squares, sprinkle with powdered sugar, and enjoy!!!

By: Ally Clinard

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