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Vans Warped Tour

 Photo by Kate Brunetti

Photo by Kate Brunetti

“... With many mixed feelings, I am here to announce that the last full cross country run of the Vans Warped Tour will take place in 2018," the statement read. Kevin Lyman, who founded the Vans Warped Tour in 1995, announced the tour would be coming to an end in 2018. This year the concert will stop in Denver on July 1st to say its goodbyes at the Pepsi Center, along with 37 other dates around the nation. In addition to bringing music to cities across the states, Warped Tour also sets up booths for its sponsors, which include food and charity initiatives as well. Warped Tour is an annual tour that has been known to tour with popular punk bands and other groups as well. In the past groups like 3OH!3, Falling In Reverse, Sublime, Blink-182, Jimmy Eat World, and more had hopped on the cross country campaign. This years tour will include sponsors like Keep a Breast, Can You Hear Me?, Peta2, and the Truth anti-smoking campaign. Warped tour has been said to be a big part of punk communities everywhere, and many are heartbroken it is coming to an end. “I'm super sad that warped is ending, and I wish I could relive it!” Senior Logan Hunt gushed. “I attended in 2014. My favorite memories were running around trying to find the designated artists I wanted to see, and getting a farmers tan that made me laugh at the end of the day because I looked so awful,” Hunt jokes. Thousands of rock fans gather at the events in the hot sun to see their favorite bands. Sophomore Savannah Ruiz is also a fan of the tour- she’s attended the festival from 2015 to 2017, and plans to go this year as well. “A lot of it, obviously, is the music, but I know at least for myself the environment is just incredible. Everywhere you look there are tents for about anything you can think of: veganism, blood donations, charities, any and all things people are passionate about. Everyone there has the same love for the music,” Ruiz remembers. She also notes the morale of the crowds during various shows. “I've seen complete strangers helping people get up to crowd surf or someone falling in the mosh pit and then strangers pull them to their feet. I think the fans of these music genres have a bad reputation, but most of them are actually the nicest people I've ever met,” Ruiz emphasized. Sophomore Katie Brunetti from Legend High School also is a fan of the tour. “My favorite part of warped tour was all of the opportunities to meet the artists I saw, along with how many different shows there were all day long. Being able to see and meet artists I’ve been wanting to see forever made my whole life,” she says. All in all, many will fondly remember the Vans Warped Tour as a place for everyone of all backgrounds to come together and interact with the bands they love. Since its founding in 1995, the tour brought together thousands of rowdy music fans and has left a mark on the rock and punk community too. Sophomore Shannon Brewer sums up the feelings of many fans: “I’m really upset because I only got the chance to go twice and it was really a life changing experience. I know people who grew up in the Warped world and go every year and it’s sad that we won’t be able to go again. It was a legacy in music culture and should be remembered as so.”

Story by Katie Heffernan

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The Beauty of Costa Rica

Every year English teacher Natasha Kasprzyk leads a school trip to a new country with different students around the school. This year Kasprzyk invited students to travel with her to the lush lands of Costa Rica. She had three students join her on the trip over spring break, and they spent the whole week in the forests, at the beach, and many other locations. Junior Leena Ettachfini, Junior Carsyn Spencer, and Sophomore Audra Walgreen joined Kasprzyk on this trip. Long before leaving Ettachfini had the opportunity to write for a scholarship for money to help pay for her trip. After a long time of waiting she discovered that she had won the national contest. “When I found out I got the scholarship, I was incomplete shock. I couldn’t believe I had actually gotten it! I was so happy and grateful that I was able to win the scholarship”, stated Ettachfini. The scholarship not only had 1,000 dollars for her, but it gave 250 dollars to Walgreen and Spencer for their trip. In addition Kasprzyk won $500 in a raffle for one of the students next year for their trip to Greece. Kasprzyk said her “heart exploded! I ran around the school, trying to find Leena -- of course she was in AP Lang -- I should have known! They were in the middle of a timed write, so I (impatiently) waited in the English office until they finished, and I made the announcement in front of Leena's class. It was one of the coolest moments in my teaching career.”  This opportunity was so special for Ettachfini as she begins to start looking into colleges. The Scholarship was a huge opportunity for them to use their creativity to potentially earn money to offset the cost of the trip. “We went walking through San Jose to look at the historic buildings and art. Then, went to Monteverde to go ziplining through the tropical rainforest. We also got to visit a local school and meet and play with the children. There were two beach days where we got to relax and enjoy the beautiful beach. We finished the trip off with a dance lesson in San Jose”, said Ettachfini. Next year  Kasprzyk is planning a 9 day cruise to Greece with Librarian Damon Larson and Practical Arts teacher Laura Sierra. With this many Chaperones, they are hoping to have more students sign up for this opportunity of a lifetime. By doing this with three teacher, the trip will have all Chaparral students instead of different students from around the country. As this will be her 5th trip with students, Kaprzyk wants this to be one of the best trips yet. All of the school trips happen over Spring Break. High School can offer students many things, but most don’t know about this incredible chance to travel around the world with friends before even graduating High School. Kasprzyk is a mom for a few days on each and everyone of these trips, as well as a teacher because she teaches the students about cultural differences, and appreciation for everyone. She will be available for more information about next year's trip to Ancient Greece in room number 303 or through email.

Story by Ava Houghton

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AP Computer Science

 Photo by Matthew McCarthy and Zach Curtis

Photo by Matthew McCarthy and Zach Curtis

Chaparral has over 20 different AP classes ranging from history classes such as AP U.S. History to AP Language and Composition. But, starting next year, Chaparral will have its first AP technology class: AP Computer Science A.The class is equivalent to a first-semester, college-level course in computer science and teaches students how to design and implement computer programs and programing tools at an advanced level. Students must take Intro to Computer Science before taking the AP class to be introduced into the vast world of Computer Science.  “The class will have 25 students next year”, said Josh Heintzelman, the teacher of the class. Heintzelman brought the class to Chaparral as he wanted to offer a more advanced class for his best computer science students. Heintzelman strongly encourages every student to at least take one computer science class at Chaparral. “I want the students to know that CS is the largest driver of all STEM jobs. Every student should take a CS course to find out if it's something that they might like,” said Heintzelman. Computer Science is a big field to get included in and pays nearly $60,000-$100,000 per year. The class is designed to prep students to take the AP Computer Science AP Test in May as many AP classes do the same. But, one aspect of the class is different than many other AP classes as students must include a minimum of 20 hours of hands-on structured lab experiences. In these labs students “design solutions to problems, express their solutions in programming language, test their solutions, identify and correct errors, and compare possible solutions.” according to the class handbook. Also, because the class is a computer science class, students use the Java programming language as their main programming language for all of the material in the class. As mentioned earlier, students will take the AP Computer Science A AP test in May. The test is scored on a scale of 1-5 and grades of 3 and above are considered passing grades to give students college credit for computer science courses they may take. The test is 3 hours long and consists of a multiple choice section with 40 questions and a free response section with 4 questions. In the free response section, students answer the questions by solving problems with code. Both sections are each individually worth 50% of the total grade for the test, and are each 1 ½ hours long. If interested in a career in Computer Science or Technology, and/or want to learn a valuable skill that can turn into a career, then signing up for Intro to Computer Science is definitely the class for you. If you want to proceed in the class and want to start developing a possible career pathway, then AP Computer Science A is the class for you.

Story by Matthew McCarthy and Zach Curtis

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2018 SHINE Conference

 Photo by Kevin Keyser

Photo by Kevin Keyser

“We empower each other to empower one another.” This is the motto of the Shine Conference 2018. This is possible to do through tribes. We all have a tribe. Those who surround us. Those who care about us. Those we can rely on for anything. These people are our tribe. On Friday March 9th, 2018, the Shine Conference was held in the Denver First Church. This conference is for girls and young women from the ages of 8 to 18 years old. At the conference, the girls are taught that they are made to shine and they must rely on their tribe to do so. This conference has a similar message to International Women’s Day. Women have the power to do what they want and all they need is their tribe to back them up. Paralympian Lacey Henderson said it best: “We all need backup.” In her speech, she talked about how she always looked up to Beyonce and wanted to be like her. She wondering how she could be so strong alone. Then she realized that Beyonce had her entire backstage crew to help her. That is Beyonce’s tribe. Henderson realized that if Beyonce needed help, then we all do. Throughout the day, there were different classes in which strong women spoke to the attendees. Some of these classes consisted of cancer survivors, social media experts, and girls in college. The classes were designed to inspire those who attended to stand up and shine bright. They are also taught to lift each other up instead of tearing each other down, like society has shown us is normal. “I believe that it is important to lift each other up because girls are taught that if someone is prettier or smarter or overall better than them that we should be jealous” junior Maria Zavaras explained. “Instead, we should be complimenting each other to make each other feel better because we don’t know what the other person is going through and they might be thinking the same thing about you." The idea of a tribe expands outside of women in the human race. The girls of the conference talked about the female elephants. When a baby is born the females of the tribe surround the mother and child and kick up dirty to protect them and warn off predators. The speakers’ goal was to inspire girls to be like the elephants. However, males can be a part of a tribe as well. Sports teams can be a tribe, teachers, friends, family, everyone. Your tribe could be people of your choosing or those who happen to fall into your life. You must protect your tribe. At Chaparral, the Chap Fam is your tribe. They must be protected so they don’t fall. After all, no one can do much alone. Singer Ali Stroker described it best, with the help of her tribe, “if I wanted it, I could create it”. We can do anything we put our minds to with a little help from those around you.

Story by Paige Wiebelhaus

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Cinematic Influences

 Graphic by Katie Baker

Graphic by Katie Baker

Movies like High School Musical and Grease forever engrain their catchy songs into our minds perpetuating the high school love story clichés, the stereotypical social groups and themes of coming of age.  However, the accuracy of these movies is questionable. The expectations and ideals placed by these movies are present. Clueless enamors it audience with the glamor of Cher and her indestructible confidence. The Breakfast Club inspires viewers with the clash of different high school stereotypes. Ferris Bueller’s Day Off is stirring in its portrayal of a high schooler with no respect for the rules. The most notorious movies play on typical high school themes of romance, rebellion and adventure. They create expectations for the high school experience that students glorify. These movies hold great influence in the decision making of students. They are inspirational and move students to life a live that reflects the big screen. Some may criticize them as detrimental to how high schoolers view their high school experience. Movies that consist of a high school scene and a message on high school tend to imply that the teenage experience is sorting into one of the typical social groups (jocks, goths, populars, nerds, etc.) and that of these groups there is a type of hierarchy between them. None of the members of these cliques are officially inaugurated, however, the existence of these ‘said’ cliques can weigh on students like they typically weigh on the main character. Mean Girls exemplifies this well when Cady struggles to fit in. Every high schooler can relate to the desire to fit in, but the movie gives representation to it. Some may argue that these movies urge students to conform to stereotypes, make friendships that are redeeming, have a magical kiss over a candle- lit birthday cake or win a renowned sports competition. These stories make high schoolers realize their high school years are limited and promote risky or rebellious decisions validated by the ‘YOLO’ or ‘I ain’t here for a long time, I’m here for a good time’ philosophy. These movies make us want to ‘live a little’ and step outside our comfort zones or test the waters. This period of self- discovery is what is ultimately depicted in high school movies, and what high schoolers go through. They inspire us to make the best out of our time, although they may push cliché groups and depict inaccurate ideas on high school, they deem high school years the best years of our life which force us to make the most.    

Story by Jaci Stickrod

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AP Jewelry

 Senior Abby Cook hard at work. 

Senior Abby Cook hard at work. 

Art is a subject taken by many students both devoted to the subject, or students looking for electives to take. Most students will take 1-2 years of an art class, some may take 3 or 4 years, but a very small few number of students make it to the AP level of an art class. One of the AP art classes offered here at Chaparral is, AP Jewelry. AP Jewelry has only 2 students in the class this year, and as of now, 1 student next year. Now while this class may lack the number many other electives have, the students make up for this in their dedication to work and expand their creations. The students over the course of the year, work on their portfolio. This is a part of their AP exam, the portfolios include almost all of their work throughout each year of Ceramics. Each creation they work through, are very important because they could possibly be displayed in their portfolios. Through each of their creations, they work on pieces of Jewelry in 3 different areas; Concentrations, breadths, and quality. “Concentrations are pieces focusing on a central idea or theme, breadth’s include a range of approaches to pieces such as soldering or wire wrapping and the way student’s approach completing a piece and quality is the quality of both their concentration and breadths,” said teacher of the AP Jewelry class Lindsay Allen. The students are suggested to complete between 18-20 pieces to submit to the AP Board. They also submit images of their pieces to the AP board for their portfolio. “They submit 8 images of 8 different pieces for their breadth’s and 10 images of 5 pieces for their concentration, and 8 images of 4 pieces for their quality pieces,” said Allen. “About every quarter we do photography sessions where we take photos of our pieces with really good cameras and nice backgrounds and nice angles to make our piece look good,” said student Abigail Cook. The class is often very independent and students spend more time working on their own than being taught. “We get a lot of freedom in what we can do, and we have a lot of freedom to do whatever pieces we want,” said Cook. If you feel that you’re capable of being in AP Ceramics while you take the first or second Ceramics course, you have the possibility of moving up immediately into AP, and many students move into the class after Ceramics 3 and/or 4. Both the AP Ceramics class and Ceramics 4 are condensed into one classroom due to the low amount of students in the AP class.

Story by Matthew McCarthy and Zachary Curtis

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Cafeteria Cleanliness

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The cafeteria provides a great service to students. Providing lunches and locations to sit & relax for 40 minutes. Although this great treatment is given to students, it’s been taken advantage of. Students have recently been leaving trash in piles and not cleaning up after themselves. Making it the teachers or janitors duty to toss their trash out. This has recently been very concerning to the entire staff and is affecting the environment at Chaparral.
At the very beginning of the year, students were unable to eat outside during lunches. The reason being due to students not taking care of the environment around them, outdoors. With this temporary ban, made student really irritated. As time passed, students were eventually allowed back outdoors. 
“The table tops in the cafeteria have got cleaner but doesn’t mean the trash has been thrown in the trash, it’s moved onto the floor or sometimes students miss the trash. We still got work to do,” said student, Matthew Morgan. The issues with trash not being thrown away outside, shifted indoors in the commons. Frustration was shown thru many teachers and the janitors. When collapsing the tables at the end of B lunch, trash that was left by students was forcefully having to be thrown away by the staff. It was getting worse and worse. Students would put the effort in pilling their tables trash into a perfect stack, and leave it at the end of the table. The extra “effort,” wasn’t implemented into the students’ movement and would left aside. “I usually sit outside, but when there is a lot of trash outside, it affects where I sit and how the courtyard looks,” said student EJ Gregory. As time continued strolling, the staff felt the need to add this issue to the class meetings for all four grades. In the class meetings, teachers discussed that every grade is taking an extra step forward in their involvement in the community. With this meeting happening, it was time for the staff to express their frustration at the students. That no longer will teachers have the responsibility to toss trash away.

Story by Joey Freeburg and Zach Curtis

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Fortnite on the Rise

 The recent popularity of Fortnite has allowed it to accumulate over 45 million players. Photo by Matt Fast

The recent popularity of Fortnite has allowed it to accumulate over 45 million players. Photo by Matt Fast

Fortnite is a game that belongs to the newly formed, niche genre of battle royale alongside other extremely popular games such as Player Unknown’s Battlegrounds. In the battle royale genre players are dropped onto a map where they compete against other players online to become the last player standing in order to win. In Fortinite, 100 players are dropped onto an extremely large map that contains 17 major regions such as Tilted Towers, Anarchy Acres, and Flush Factory. Once landed, players compete to find loot and chests to collect weapons, health, and shields to compete to be the last player left standing. However, players cannot simply find a bush and sit in it for the entire round. The “storm” pushes areas to a random location on the map that gets smaller and smaller every time the storm comes in again. Players caught outside the set location take damage until they die and are eliminated from the competition. Junior Jacob Boehle said, “I like to play on the weekends and occasionally on school nights. I play with my friends because it’s fun to hang out and be competitive with the boys.” Fortnite has taken popularity among gamers worldwide and many teenagers within Parker and at Chap have caught on to the trend. Part of what has led to this popularity is the ease of access to Fortnite. For Xbox Live Gold users the game is free to play as it is still in beta testing. Fortnite also has many interesting game mechanics that differentiate it from other games. The ability to collect resources and build cover and forts is essential to the game design. This along with the cartoonish graphics and unrealistic gameplay sets Fortnite apart from other 3rd person shooter games. Fortnite also is a very social game with game modes such as duos or squads where a player can team up with 1-3 other players in order to compete against other squads in the game. Many students at Chap have their dedicated squad or partner that they play with whenever they play Fortnite which makes the game a more enjoyable and social experience. Junior Noah Gerwinat said, “I play Fortnite to relieve stress and to enjoy the light-hearted, competitiveness in video games. It’s an excellent game to play with friends and I’ve met so many new people. My go-to strategy for solos is to land somewhere inconspicuous, my favorite location being the metal crates near Wailing Woods.” Fortnite has blown up among students and doesn’t look to be losing steam in popularity soon. Not a day goes by without talk between players in the hallway of the amazing game they played last night, their disappointing loss that was so close yet so far, or their funniest story about how they tried to hop in a bush that was already occupied. Students will keep continue to play, continue to build friendships through the game as a social platform, and continue to grind for sweet, sweet victory royale.

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AP Graphic Design

 Students designing their assignments. Photo by Matthew McCarthy and Zach Curtis.

Students designing their assignments. Photo by Matthew McCarthy and Zach Curtis.

Chaparral offers a multitude of Advanced Placement classes for all of Chaparral’s students to take. These classes range from history classes like AP U.S. Government to elective courses like AP Studio Art.  31 AP classes were offered at Chaparral this year, but some are very advanced and have a small number of students. AP Graphic design is one of these classes, as that an average of only 12 to 15 students take the class each year. Many of the students have taken at least three classes of Graphic Design, some four. The year long AP Graphic Design is different from many AP classes with the amount of concentration and creativity required. Students don’t have daily assignments, but they are required to complete 12 Concentrations and 12 Breadth’s by the end of the year. Concentrations are specific Graphic design pieces, but students can choose how they want to approach their concentrations. “For AP, students must work on a Concentration, that means they must concentrate on one particular kind of design or idea. This could be logo design or album covers. One year I had a student do posters dealing with child abuse and neglect. Last year I had a couple students design logos for Olympics in cities that they chose,” said teacher Jeremy Kamm. Breadth’s are assignments that is another approach to design, usually other types of design the students have experience in. These twenty four assignments complete a students portfolio, which they submit at the end of the year to the college board instead of taking an AP exam. But, the students have the freedom to choose what they want to concentrate on, and what their Breadth’s will be, and have the luxury of the free time in class every day to complete these assignments by the end of the year. There is lots and lots of individual work. By the time my students reach AP Graphic Design they are on their own in the sense that they have a lot of work to do and a certain amount of time to do it. We will occasionally have critiques in which we will look at everyone’s work to help them see the weaknesses and strengths in their designs,” said Kamm. Jeremy Kamm, the teacher of all the Graphic Design classes, has been teaching AP Graphic Design specifically for 14 years. Students in all AP classes are graded on a different grading scale administered by the AP board. The scale is from a 1 to a 5, and a 3,4, and 5 are passing scores. “I have had no one get lower than a 3 and the vast majority get a 4 or 5,” said Kamm.  Cooper Bisset, a student in the class spoke about what he likes about the class and his concentration for the year: designing album covers. “The freedom is great, most other classes there are specific assignments, specific due dates, and you’re limited by the assignments, but here I can do whatever I want every day,” said Bisset. Although AP Graphic Design has a significant amount of work to do throughout the year, if you’re interested in the freedom and creativity to design what you want, begin taking Graphic Design to have the possibility of taking the advanced class.

Story by Matthew McCarthy and Zach Curtis

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Away for the Holidays

 The Las Vegas Strip was one of the many placs visited over Christmas break. Photo by Maddie Smith

The Las Vegas Strip was one of the many placs visited over Christmas break. Photo by Maddie Smith

The long-awaited winter break has finally come to a close. As students begin to venture back into their schooling mindsets, they reflect on the cool things they did and saw. Many students like Maddie Smith and Jake Olson traveled with friends and family and spent their holidays in another state. Junior Maddie Smith “ went to Las Vegas for the second week of winter break." They stayed for a week and visited many shops as they walked along the busy streets. For Smith, “the best part of the trip is when my mom got proposed to." What a great way to end a vacation! Smith is more fond of the hotter climate which is why Las Vegas is the number one get-away spot for her and her family. Although not many families choose to travel over the holidays, families like Jake Olson’s make it a tradition. For the past five years Olson and his family have visited Chicago to see relatives and enjoy fun activities with each other. “We usually go into the city and see the lights hung around since it’s almost christmas,” explains Olson. Jake and his family enjoy the colder weather especially in the holiday season. No matter the weather these are both fun ways to bring families closer together and make amazing holiday memories. No matter what holiday you celebrate or who you celebrate with, traveling can always be a great way to make your holiday season a bit more thrilling. Now no one needs to travel over break, students like junior student Sarah Mueller stayed home while other family members came down from Michigan. “ I had no idea they were coming which made it even more exciting,” says Mueller.  No matter what the activity was or where you stayed, winter break was long-waited and a great way for students to relax after the long and stressful finals week.

Story by Jade Gurule

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Women's March 2018

 Photo by Ava Houghton

Photo by Ava Houghton

The streets are overflowing with nasty women, women who are ready to fight for what is theirs, equal rights for immigrants, women, and everyone.They are shouting, yelling, and ready to fight. The year of 2018 better be prepared for the avalanche that is coming their way. Women all around the country gathered to kick off the second annual Women’s March. On January 20th in Denver, individuals rose early in the morning, gathered for the lightrail, and crammed the streets with signs and consistent hollering. Before the march, everyone massed into Civic Center Park for the Pre-rally and listened to many speakers prepare people for the power that the President would be sure to notice. After one of the coordinators of the Women’s March spoke, the Mayor of Denver, Michael Hancock gave a speech that lit a fire in over 50,000 people. After a list of why people were marching today, he ended his speech with this, “ And yes, Donald Trump today we’re marching for the dreamer’s today,” stated Hancock. As he sparked a fire in people, this whole movement would not have begun without the creators of the Women’s March. “We believe that Women’s Rights are Human Rights and Human Rights are Women’s Rights,”(womensmarch.com). On January 20th women from around the country gather to protect their human rights. In 2017 4.2 million people gathered together throughout 600 and more cities across America. According to the New York Times the Women’s March began as a project on Facebook after the election of current President Donald J. Trump. Teresa Shook invited 40 of her friends to join her to march on Washington after Trump was elected, the next morning she awoke to more than 10,000 responses. The name began as “Million P*ssy March” in reference to a slur used by Donald Trump. They eventually decided on the “Women’s March on Washington.” The march was organized to fight for human rights, as well as rights as woman. According to their website, the Women’s March purpose is to “harness the political power of diverse women and their communities to create transformative social change.” They are focusing on ending violence, reproductive rights, LGBTQIA rights, worker’s rights, civil rights, disability rights, immigrant rights, and environmental justice. Contrary to belief, the streets are not only crawling with women, but they are racing with women, children, and men in the fight for Human rights. The snowflakes that are scattered along the country, turned into a never-ending avalanche. The Women’s March protects America's first amendment right and will continue to as long as the fire within everyone continues to burn bright and hot.

Story by Ava Houghton

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Sheltering the Community

 Making anywhere feel like home. Photo by Ava Houghton

Making anywhere feel like home. Photo by Ava Houghton

Here in Parker, Colorado, homelessness is not apparent. The population of people swept out into the streets is minimal compared to larger cities; however, Parker is emerging. It has seen  growth in numbers from 23,000 residents in 2000 to 46,000 in 2013. This indicates an expansion of everything, such as, hospitals, schools, companies, and subdivisions. The growth of Parker also creates an expectation for an influx of people. Along with the increase of residents, homelessness increases as well and the town needs a way to help those people. The Winter Shelter Network, as hosted by several churches across the town attempts to limit large numbers of homelessness in Parker. There are seven churches in the Parker area that have a designated night when they open their doors and provide services to those without homes. Each church is composed of several teams that provide meals, blankets, and job opportunities. Each church has a care coordinator that is aware of what is going on in the area and has connections with other locals in the town. Guests arrive from 5 to 8 p.m. and sign up to stay overnight. If the guest needs transportation, the churches have made a deal with Lyft to help them arrive to their destination, and for those that have cars, gas cards are given out. Multiple people stay at the church overnight and keep it safe. These churches cover a variety of basic needs. The program was in the making for two years and initially inspired by a system similar to one in Atlanta. It expanded to other churches in the Parker area, creating a network of help. These churches are not like conventional homeless shelters, they are a place of worship on sundays and saturdays, but the typical residents conjured up when the word homeless is mentioned are not the ones that attend these churches. “Some guests travel and some are working as CNAs,” says Volunteer Coordinator Melissa Miller. The Winter Shelter Network is an unconventional homeless shelter. The churches really utilize what they have to offer and open up what they have to others. The environment is atypical as well, “It’s just like having a guest in your home,” says Miller. As the weather is starting to turn and the holidays draw nearer, Winter Shelter Network will be more crucial to those who need to find a warm bed and a hot meal. The program is an amazing option for nights of crises, nights where there is no other option. It is also a symbol of hospitality and giving. “There is so much connection made between the volunteers and the participants. It makes the community smaller,” says Miller. The service is beginning a new chapter in the community and expects to make a greater impact next year. Churches are considering offering their space during the day. The growth of the program will aim to imitate the town of Parker, expanding what it has to offer to all residents.

Story by Jaci Stickrod

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College Tuition

 Where will your pin go? Photo by Katie Heffernan

Where will your pin go? Photo by Katie Heffernan

Colorado students thinking about going to college in an out-of-state college may qualify for cheaper in-state tuition costs at out-of-state schools when they go to colleges in states like Hawaii, Wyoming, and Arizona thanks to tuition reciprocity agreements. One of the biggest programs for tuition reciprocity is the Western Undergraduate Exchange Program. A number of schools in states that participate in the WUE are home to two and four year public colleges that can offer out-of-state students 150% of their in-state tuition costs. States in this program include most every state behind Colorado going West- Hawaii, Alaska, California, Nebraska, the list goes on and on. However, not all colleges may choose to offer this program so you must check to see what universities extend this deal to students. “The thing about it is it depends school-to-school,” Post Grad Specialist Mary Jo Pook explains. “Every school can decide whether they’re going to participate or not. At some schools, every student qualifies that comes from out-of-state. It usually means that they get one and a half times said state’s tuition, not the [tuition from the] state the student comes from.” she continues. Some colleges only offer the privileges for specific majors. “That’s the misnomer. Other schools can decide if they will offer it at all, and if they do, what they’re going to offer it for.” For example, those who would like to go to the University of Arizona under the WUE may go, but only if they major in Mining Engineering. No other majors are offered at that university, so nobody can assume they’ll get the program for exactly what they’d like to major in. Schools that offer the exchange program also differ in how it is earned or rewarded. In some colleges, students who register may acquire the arrangement with no action. In others, pupils must apply for it like a scholarship and meet certain requirements such as a set GPA and a high school diploma. For instance,at the University of Hawaii at Hilo freshman applicants need a 3.0 cumulative GPA and at least 4 years of attending high school. “You could go talk to Wyoming University and check out their WUE scholarship- but in Wyoming you have to apply for it like a scholarship.” Pook disclosed. Ultimately, if high school students are considering going out of state for college, it’s a great idea to check if they qualify for the WUE program. While sometimes it is not ideal for every student’s plan, it is good to double check just in case. In some cases the WUE program offers better tuition than other scholarships someone could get. “I think it should be in those arsenal scholarships,” Pook concludes. “You just see if it’s the best scholarship or if you can get something that’s better. It’s just that at every school you have to see what they offer.” To check which schools participate in the WUE and to get more information on specific colleges and the majors they offer, students may go to the organization’s website at WICHE.edu for more information.

Story by Katie Heffernan

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Spanish Honors Society

 Photo by Ava Houghton

Photo by Ava Houghton

Language is one of the hardest things to grasp as a human race and, there are over 6,000 living languages throughout the entire world. For the Spanish Honor Society, language is their passion and, they understand it and want to spread the Spanish language around the school and the community. There are many ways that one simple sentence can be expressed in many different ways in Spanish that can ultimately change the importance of the sentence. Junior Emma Yáñez has discovered more about herself and the language in general by joining Spanish Honor Society. “I joined Spanish Honor Society because it grants me the opportunity to remain with my heritage and culture with those in the community of my school that share the same passion for the culture and spanish language,” stated Yáñez. As this club does explore the language in the school, they explore the language in Denver’s Community. “For volunteering we engage by doing things such as Sweet Street and offering tutoring during homeroom,” said Yáñez. They go to nursing homes and sing to the people who live there, and they speak with people around them in Spanish. “My favorite part of the club is getting involved with the other members by doing things such as celebrating Día de Los Muertos at the Botanical Gardens and doing other activities that allow us to expand our knowledge on the various aspects of the culture,” said Yáñez. As most high school students have chosen to take Spanish because it’s a requirement, the impact that learning a language has on one’s mind can help transform their future. According to pewresearch.org, by 2020 the number of people speaking Spanish will be anywhere from 39 million to 43 million. Many people are choosing to speak Spanish at home even if it isn’t their “cultural language” because the language challenges their children’s mind in ways that the English language can’t. Since this club can be very impactful on student’s lives, it is challenging to get into. “ In order to be able to join Spanish Honor Society, you have to be in at least Spanish four and to have at least a 3.5 GPA. The induction Ceremony is towards the beginning of every year, and is run by our current members,” stated Yáñez. The Spanish Language is a very important language that is bound to be within all of us in a few years and the Spanish Honor Society is an important way to learn more about the Spanish Culture and the language itself.

Story by Ava Houghton

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Lit of Film

 Photo by Terra Koontz

Photo by Terra Koontz

Here at Chaparral High School, hundreds of courses are offered. They have the basic core classes, the typical electives, and the ones not many know about. Literature of Film is one of the more unknown ones. Any student has the opportunity to take this semester long class, and because of the “unique content and amazing teacher,” says junior Andrew Feghali, the opportunity should be taken. In the grand scheme of things, they “watch movies and have discussions about our thoughts, how the characters developed, and techniques we saw used in the movie,” says student Mason Gump. The class has watched movies of many genres, and they are able to take a movie such as Lord of the Rings and turn them into an educational experience by evaluating all components of the movie.Some students may claim it’s just an easy A, but after students finish taking the class, they feel as if they’ve “learned a lot of interesting information [I] didn’t know before,” says Feghali. “The main components of this class, are to teach the students to recognize everyday techniques used and why they are used, and to give them new insight on movies and more,” exclaims teacher Mike McEwan.  “I love teaching this class, because it’s very intriguing to see the different angles each student sees the movies at,” says McEwan. If you choose to take Literature of Film, and you genuinely enjoy it, there is an option to take Literature of Film ll as well. “I would definitely take Literature of Film ll, I loved the first one so I don’t see why not,” says Gump. “Yes I would most likely take Literature of Film ll,” says Feghali. Obviously you must take Literature of Film before taking the second one, and if you’re looking for a laid-back and different class, this is the one for you. “It’s very chill and something new compared to other classes, so I would recommend it to other students,” says Gump. “It’s highly encouraged to expand your horizons,” says McEwan. So if Literature of Film peaks your interest, sign up for next year!

Story by Terra Koontz



 

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Taking Classes Elsewhere

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Senior Olivia Hummel shows off her scissor tattoo that was inspired by her love for cosmetology. Photo by Nick Brown

All schools offer different advantages to their students, it is just up to the students to utilize them. Chaparral student Olivia Hummel, Castle View student Olivia Neumann, and Ponderosa student Jordyn Cahill want the most out of their school experience even if it means they must go to another school to take specialized classes. Hummel travels to Colorado’s Finest Cosmetology Academy in Englewood to take classes in cosmetology while Cahill travels from Ponderosa and Neumann comes all the way from Castle Rock to come take pre-med classes here at Chap. These students must make many sacrifices to be able to be successful in the extra classes and make it to their school on time as well. Neumann has to wake up at 5:15 AM to be able to make it on time, but she has no regrets about taking the class as she says, “Having the ability to experience so many careers in the medical field has really opened up my horizons.” They each have their own reasons for sacrificing so much to get to the classes. Hummel also has to wake up at 5 in the morning and she says she gets her motivation because, “It makes me so happy to help other people and make them feel better about themselves just by changing their hair.” Cahill said her experience crossing schools to go to a class has been great because, “I’ve learned a lot about what i need to do to become successful in my future.” Cahill even said it had helped her prepare for college so much that she recommends the class, even if one must cross schools to go to it, to anyone who is interested in going into the medical field. All three agree that even though they must sacrifice some sleep and time, traveling to a different school for additional information on a subject they plan to pursue outside of school, is very beneficial for success.

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Canned Food Drive Recap

 Boxes upon boxes filled with cans for the Parker Task Force. Photo by Erica Grotts

Boxes upon boxes filled with cans for the Parker Task Force. Photo by Erica Grotts

Every year Chaparral comes together to help out the Parker community with an abundance of cans. It’s a school wide contribution of canned foods and monetary donations that are taken to the Parker Task Force. Chaparral’s canned food started on October 23rd and went through November 3rd, which was a fantastic week and a half. The previous years of the canned food drive has been very successful and this year was no different. Chaparral junior and Student Government member Noah Gerwinat shared that “[his] favorite part was being a part of Student Government, getting to pack the cans into boxes everyday, and seeing the enormous numbers of cans that classes were able to bring in. It was very fun and rewarding to fill an entire box and stack it up on the pile of countless cans.” For the 2017-18 school year, 13,996 cans were raised for the Parker Task Force, and $2,135.05 was raised for the Chap Fam Fund. Another Student Government member, junior Chloe Croissant said “Overall as a school we really came together for a great cause and that is all we can ever ask for!” Every non-perishable food item raised along with items like diapers, deodorant, and feminine products goes to those in need in the community with the approaching holiday season and Chaparral stepped up to deliver. Student body president and Student Government member Ally Swain said “[she] expects Chaparral to be as giving as it possibly can be so whatever the outcome it will be amazing.” If every year the amount of cans and money raised by Chaparral students continues to go up, there will be more people touched and families taken care of. Overall this was a great turnout for the canned food drive, with Chaparral being a part of something much bigger.

Story by Devon Williams and Erica Grotts

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Concert Season

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The empty amphitheater that holds thousands of people. Photo by Devon Williams

As the seasons start to change, the concerts and events at Red Rocks Amphitheatre come to an end. This is a very upsetting ending for people who attend multiple concerts at Red Rocks throughout the year. Red Rocks will be a place to hike and to workout until the sun comes back out again. With only two more concerts left, if you have never been to a concert or event at Red Rocks, you wouldn’t know that it is one of the most amazing venues. The rocks are to the left and right of you, and if you stand to look at the stage, a view of the city lights is behind the artist performing right in the middle. When asked about her favorite part as well as the most outstanding thing about the venue, senior Taylor Whitrock said “[her] favorite part about Red Rocks was definitely watching Russ get so emotional about his fans, and he was so moved by the crowd. Also how many people were there, the fact that it was outside and the rocks. It made everything sound so much louder and bigger than just being in the normal Pepsi Center.” This is extremely different than venues such as the Pepsi Center or the Ogden where a bad seat could mean a bad viewing of the concert as well as the sound bouncing off the rocks. At Red Rocks, each seat has an unobscured viewing of the artist making Red Rocks very unique. Red Rocks was opened on June 15, 1941 and can sit 9,525 people. About a week ago, hip hop artist Russ performed at Red Rocks. Russ had started with a very small fan base and it has only grown from his start. Russ tweeted “I started out at 600 ppl in Denver last summer, then 1,100 a couple months later, then 3,600 this past summer, then 10k last night. Build.” Red Rocks is a crazy place to perform for most artists due to the location. The concerts ending will be back soon, but you’re still able to go check out Red Rocks with a small hike.

Story by Devon Williams

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