Comment

2018 ICDC Nationals

 So proud of our DECA competitors. Photo by Bonnie Enright.

So proud of our DECA competitors. Photo by Bonnie Enright.

On Sunday, April 21 Chaparral DECA set off to Atlanta, Georgia for the ICDC Nationals. Thirty-eight members from DECA qualified for nationals, to compete against 15,000 others from around the world. This year, thirty eight members qualified for the DECA national competition. The following participants were awarded these prestigious achievements; senior Miranda Silva, won a $2,000 National DECA scholarship, junior Brock Mullen was a top test score in his Financial Services Team event, senior Kinsey Baber was a Marketing Communications Role Play finalist, and senior Cassie Minne was a top performer in her preliminary section and finalist for Hospitality and Tourism Professional Selling event. Lastly, seniors Jack Dewolf and Nick Kounkel who have been in DECA for three years and have traveled to nationals each year, yet again, won esteemed triumphs. Dewolf and Kounkel were inclined to be called “finalists for the third year in a row for their Business Growth Plan, which is a huge feat! AND this year they were also called up at closing ceremonies as a Top 10 finisher from their final presentations!” said marketing teacher Bonnie Enright. Over all, the nationals competition was a towering success for Chaparral, and many hard working students were granted prestigious awards and achievements. Many of the up-and-coming DECA members, will have large shoes to fill when the 2018 seniors have graduated. These students lived up to, and even surpassed the expected accomplishments of this DECA season.

Story by Hannah Lee

Comment

Comment

Talented Wolverines

 Photo by Paige Bowers

Photo by Paige Bowers

This year's theme for the 2018 S.O.S. (Students On Stage) was, The Show must Go On. The talent show was divided into two separate nights, both displaying 21 unique acts that consisted of: singing, dancing, and comedy. Each night displayed students from throughout Chap who shared their talents. While our amazing students on stage would get ready to go on,  Chaps 2018 Emcees had something special to perform for the audience. These Emcees performed skits during the show transitions. The main acts that the Emcees performed was as teachers at Chap that are preparing to perform a musical. In this case they performed High School Musical. This year's Emcees were: Caroline Norris as Mr. Ferguson, Joe Steiner as Mr. Stowers, Brenden Gilliss as Mr. Culotta, Michelle Diller as Ms. Doyle, Cade Anderson as Ms. Lewis, Joel Thompson as Mr. Gardner, Paige Bowers as Ms. Graves, Chloe Cherro as Ms. Closs, Nathan Hile as Mr. Peterson, and Ethan McBride as Mr. Anderson. They beautifully portrayed the funny habits that these teachers around Chap have. The Emcee skits were not only about the Chaparral staff. In between there would be random skits ranging from “You’re probably from Parker” jokes to some hip rapping parents. Aside from the goofy Emcees, The S.O.S. performers put on a great show for those who watched the performance. The Chap students who sang warmed the crowds hearts with their voices and instrument playing. Many students like Katie Nelson, Izze Sajdak, Jordan Faulkner, and Brielle Taylor performed singing acts while playing the ukulele. The dancing acts of 2018’s S.O.S. were beautifully performed by students such as Mollie Steward. There were many acts as well that lightened the mood with there comedic lip sync battles, stand up and quirky magic.  Overall the students of Chaparral High School did an amazing job uniting and putting on a spectacular performance for those within the Chaparral community.

Story by Elysia Nunez

Comment

Comment

2018 Prom Recap

With the school year coming to an end, Chaparral High School’s prom was hosted at Wings Over the Rockies Air and Space Museum on April 20th, 2018. For many students, especially seniors, prom was the last hoorah before enduring the stressful week of finals. Many juniors and seniors either went with dates, or with friends. Either way, the students had a great time. For many seniors, it was a bitter-sweet moment to attend their last high school dance, but not a minute was waisted as the class of 2018 danced the night away. The Top Prom theme was loved by many and was a great way to show off the mesmerizing planes and other aircrafts displayed at the dance. Students were seen dancing the night away with their dates, group of friends, and guests. They had the time of their life as the DJ played popular songs that caught the attention of the students, allowing them to sing along and make memories. After prom was a big hit as well! Hosted by many Chaparral parents, the central theme was Harry Potter, and no student would deny that it was a magical night. The main staircase was covered by a slide which took students down to the commons which was decorated in all things Harry Potter. The large gym however was a casino themed area which allowed students to challenge each other in mind-bending and strategic games. Junior Chaparral student, Maddie Smith had her own dad volunteer as a casino worker, “My dad is from Las Vegas so he was excited to help host a casino themed game,” explains Smith. There were even photographers that attended the night and helped capture the magic within Chaparral. Good job to all the work that was put into the dance as well as after prom! Chaparral students had a great time dancing the night away and showing off their stunning dresses and suits and ties.

Story by Jade Gurule and Jordan Freeman

Comment

Comment

The New Superintendent

After several weeks of panels, focus groups, and evaluations, the search for the new Douglas County School District Superintendent is officially over! The selection process involved narrowing down a pool of nearly 1,100 potential candidates to just a hand full of finalists, and thoroughly screening each of the remaining contenders until a final vote from the Douglas County Board of Education would determine the winner. On April 5th, 2018, a unanimous vote from the Board of Education deemed Dr. Thomas S. Tucker as the sole finalist for the DCSD superintendent position. Dr. Tucker is currently serving as the superintendent of Princeton City Schools in Cincinnati, Ohio, and was the first African American to hold an upper level administrative position in a major central Ohio district. However, his experience and merits in public schools do not stop there; along with his prior roles as superintendent, he has also been a teacher, principal, vice principal, and Director of Secondary Curriculum, all of which have accumulated to 29 years of experience. During his 29 years, Tucker has received the honor of ‘National Superintendent of the Year’ from the National Alliance of Black School Educators in 2013, and the American Association of School Administrators in 2016. He has also received praise for his ability to make significant reforms in his previous school districts, with minimal reliance on District funding. According to his colleagues and peers, Dr. Tucker has made a massive impact on several midwestern public schools districts: “I am confident that no superintendent in America has done more for his or her district than Dr. Tucker has done for Worthington Ohio in the past two years,”  claims Charlie Wilson, the President of the Ohio School Boards Association. Given his long list of qualifications, experience, titles, and passion for educational service, it appears that Dr. Thomas S. Tucker could definitely have a very positive impact on the the future of Douglas County schools.

Story by Hannah Wankel

Comment

Comment

Wish Week 2018

 Meet 13 year old Jakob. Photo by Terra Koontz

Meet 13 year old Jakob. Photo by Terra Koontz

Every year, the whole Chap Fam community comes together to create an insanely magical week all in honor of supporting one special soul. This year we were blessed to add Jakob’s special soul to our Chap Fam. 13 years old from Parker, Colorado, Jakob is one of the most light-hearted and kind-spirited kids you will ever meet. Jakob is a very active kid and although he participates in many sports, his favorites are soccer and hockey. Jakob has also spent a great part of his life fighting his life-threatening disorder, cystic fibrosis. The first year with his disorder was a tough one, with five surgeries they almost lost him, but Jakob and his family had the strength to get through it and make it to where they are today. Keeping up with Jakob’s disorder is a daily regimen for the family. About an hour of the day is set aside for his medications and other routinely checks that help keep him on track. Due to his disorder, Jakob has missed out on a large part of the childhood everyone should get to experience, so the Chaparral community wanted to give that experience to Jakob by not only providing an amazing week to support him but by granting his wish to meet the one and only John Cena. “To me, John Cena symbolizes never giving up,” says Jakob. And Chap, we certainly never gave up on Jakob. It was a short but sweet journey down the week-long road to making Jakob’s wish come true. Starting off the magical week we all look forward to, was the opening assembly on Friday March 2, where students packed the stands making the gym a white-out. Several speakers and a stunning performance by Chap’s choir, Con Brio, led to the sensational reveal of our wish kid, Jakob. The assembly concluded with the miracle minute, where in the first minute of wish week alone, we raised $4,401. Later that night kids glided through the Discovery Park ice rink and got a delicious treat at Orange Leaf frozen yogurt. It was then rise and shine for Saturdays Chasing the Dream 5k where Jakob had a great time counting down the race for the record breaking 350 participants. The Wish Week Festival took place saturday as well, where Jakob and an estimated 500 people from Chap and surrounding feeder schools enjoyed the game booths and delicious food trucks. People chowed down at Costa Vida throughout Saturday as well. The community then brought their starving stomachs to Hangry Ohana all day Sunday. The first school day of wish week, Monday, was kicked off with an exclusive showing of Jakob’s favorite movie, Big Hero 6. 250 people helped to pack the theater for the special showing. During lunches and after school, cars zoomed to Panera, Chipotle, and Anthony's, as they were the restaurants for the day. On Tuesday, students and families showed their support by going to Texas Roadhouse, Panda Express, and Cane’s. Walking into school Wednesday morning was a sea of red as students and faculty wore red, Jakob’s favorite color, in support. Flippin’ Flapjacks was available from 8-10 am providing the perfect breakfast needed to fuel up for that night’s annual dodgeball tournament, and this year’s was epic. The stands were full to the brim with students, teachers, and families, and Jakob’s dream team made up of professional and collegiate athletes did not disappoint. They were able to claim victory over Diesel’s Only in the finals, but they couldn’t have done it without the support of an astounding 1,500 participants and spectators. After burning all those calories through a long and tough dodgeball tournament, students sought to satisfy their hunger at The Chicken Shack, Kunjani, and Cold Stone. On Thursday, students flipped on their hats for hat day and flipped over to SkyZone for a night full of jumping and fun with Jakob. The attendance was much greater than last years with a total of 186 jumpers. The exhausted jumpers then made their way to Lil’ Ricci’s and Chick-fil-a for a refreshing meal. The week flew by, and Friday, the day we’ve all been waiting for, quickly rolled around. I guess time really does fly by when you’re having fun! Students impatiently fidgeted in their chairs in all seven periods until the end of the day when students gathered in the gym, filling the stands with black, eager to see how much our time and effort paid off. It began with each feeder school presenting their big paychecks to the crowd, and they did awesome this year. Each school put in more time, effort, and donations than ever before. It then came the time to see how Chap did, and we blew it out of the water with an astonishing $83,631.31! Smiles and tears filled the room, with the total leaving everyone in a state of pure joy. Then the viking clap was used to reveal that not only are we granting Jakob’s wish to meet John Cena, but we are making 10 other fighters dreams come true! That is truly incredible. This week, as always, really was something special. So many smiles and laughs were exchanged through students, Jakob, and his family, and irreplaceable memories were made which after all, that’s what Wish Week is all about. Jakob has been so unbelievably strong in fighting his disorder, and throughout the week, whether people donated their time or money, the Chap Fam proved to be there to #Fight4Jakob.

Story by Terra Koontz

Comment

Comment

Cinderella Opening Weekend

Rodgers and Hammerstein’s broadway version of the classic tale Cinderella, was given a wonderful twist by Chaparral’s performing arts program. This opening weekend, February 22-24, was a success for the cast and crew of the show, selling out the whole theatre the first night it was shown and coming close to another sellout every other night. With the incredible talent of the actors, ensemble, and live music from Chaparral’s band, it is a show that is a must see for everyone.  Seniors Izze Sadjak and Cade Anderson played the two main roles of Cinderella and Prince Topher, who “fit the part perfectly,” Sr. Maddie Wheatley claimed, “it was the first school play I have ever been to and I really regret not attending more. It was amazing seeing some of my classmates in a whole new way, doing something they love.” The broadway version of the play resembles the original in many ways, while also providing the characters with humour, a rare kindness, and new creativeness. Evil step sister Gabrielle, played by senior Morgan Erwin who has been involved in 17 previous plays, was not as evil as she is portrayed to be, leaving the audience with an anxious thrill and wonder. Along with the curiosity around Gabrielle is the shocking event when Cinderella didn’t leave her shoe on the stairs at first- WHAT?! For eight dollars per student and twelve dollars for adults, the anticipating and astounding musical directed by Chap’s very own David Peterson is one that will bring you guilt if you miss out. Homemade snacks, cool souvenirs and the remarkable talent and pride of your peers, what more could you ask for? Go see the play!

Next showings are March 1-3 at 7 P.M., and March 3 at 1 P.M.

Story by Hannah Bancroft

Comment

Comment

The 2018 Sadie Hawkins Dance

Sadie Hawkins is a dance held every year at Chaparral and many other schools throughout the United States, where untraditionally the girl asks the boy to be her date. The Sadie Hawkins dance is names after the Li’l Abner comic strip character Sadie Hawkins created by cartoonist Al Capp. This idea originated in 1937 when the comic was popular and the main character was referred to as “the homiest gal in all them hills” by her father and when she reached the age 35, she still had no one to marry her, the foot was put down and Sadie’s father declared it Sadies Hawkins Day. Sadie Hawkins became a teen trend in the late 30’s and early 40’s where the young generation declared it okay to buck traditional gender roles by asking the guy out on a date rather than being asked. The First ever Sadie Hawkins dance was held on November 9, 1938. When this type of dance was first held the theme was winter-esque and girls would would wear sparkling whites and silvers while the males would dress nice in a suit and tie. Now in the twenty first century, high schoolers have been taking a more casual approach, leaving the sparkles for homecoming. Females will typically wear a more casual dress with a small heeled shoe, or even their everyday high top converse. Boys will wear khaki pants with a nice button down, maybe a bowtie if feeling fancy. When girls ask boys to the dance, they will usually come up with a cute poster featuring a cute phrase or showcasing their hopeful future date’s interest, similar to a “promposal.”  Sadie Hawkins is usually held in late January or early February rather than the original dates of November. This year, leading up to the dance, the annual spirit week dress up days were participated by students. Chaparral's Sadie Hawkins dance was held on January 26 in the commons after school from 8:30-10:30 pm.

Story by Lauren Haviland

Comment

Comment

Stock Show

 Photo by Aubrey Bowlus

Photo by Aubrey Bowlus

National Western Stock Show is an annual event and rodeo held in January. It has been held at the National Western Complex in Denver since 1906, making the 2018 event the 112th annual Stock Show. 705,574 guests attended the 2018 Stock Show throughout the month of January. The event features Pro Rodeo, Livestock shows, Horse shows, Trade shows, and special events. Many men compete in the Pro Rodeo in different competitions like Steer wrestling and Team roping. There is also events like Bareback RIding and Saddle Bronc Riding. Women participate in events such as Westernaires and other horse competitions. They also do Mutton Bustin’ which is when young children get on a sheep and let them run. Their events are fun for the entire family. The National Western Organization is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization that helps provide scholarships in agriculture and medicine. They fund as many as 100 scholarships every year through their scholarship program. The National Western Scholarship Organization was formed in 1983 and their scholarship range from $2500 to %15,000 a person. National Western is planning on redeveloping through a multi-phase plan to “Honor the Legacy, and Build the Future”. It will involve road and rail infrastructure improvements, revive the South Platte River, and the establishment of a CSU academic center. National Western is hoping these facilities will enhance the visitor experience, provide the ability to host a wide variety of events, and increase the attendance at the Stock Show. They will also have four new core facilities including The Legacy Building, the Livestock Center, the Yards, and the Equestrian Center. People can donate at the National Western website to help them with the redevelopment and building. The National Western Stock Show will continue growing and developing new ideas in order to better the community. They plan on sustaining their legacy next January.

Story by Aubrey Bowlus

Comment

Comment

Class Meetings

Chaparral High School students started off the second semester by attending a mandatory meeting held in the Mary Gill Theater to discuss their future plans for high school or college, course selection information, as well as reminders on how to make Chaparral a welcoming and enjoyable environment for both students and staff. On Wednesday January 10th, juniors were called down to the auditorium where they were given a brief description on ways in which they can be ahead on course selection. Mr. Mullen the counseling department chairman; introduced the new system of how juniors may decide on course selection and making prestigious college applications while seeking help from counselors and other administrators. Posted outside the counseling office, students will find “first come, first serve” sign up sheets that reserves their spot to get assistance. These help sessions will take as long as two class periods. The first hour will demonstrate how to construct a complete college application. As for the second hour, juniors will be introduced to new courses and opportunities available for their last high school year. Each sign up sheet have certain periods listed for students to be excused from two classes, this will allow students to choose which time best fits their schedule. There are only limited amount of spots so make sure you sign up as soon as possible! Following Mr. Mullens informational speech, Mr. Mossman reminded all Chaparral Students on the three ways that make Chaparral stand out which are Personal Integrity, Academic Excellence, and Social Responsibility. Ever since the beginning of Chaparral High School these three things are key factors that make  this school have a great impact on students academic lives. All of the Chaparral community can demonstrate personal integrity by setting examples for others, building trust with peers and staff members, and having pride and confidence in everything they do. This school is what we make it. If there is trash on the ground pick it up, if a peer is having trouble with a class help them out because it's these little acts of kindness that builds an outstanding community.  Academic excellence can be shown not only by students but as well as teachers because they “ are teaching more than just the curriculum,” says Mossman. Teachers instill life lessons that will be important for students growth and different situations that may lie in the future. Ultimately upperclassman should always demonstrate great social responsibility because “when you leave here you aren’t just a teen walking through life, you're a Chaparral student [and] everytime you leave here you are apart of us” advises Mr. Persichina. So remember Chap, helps others when needed, take care of one another, and always have pride in what you do and what you leave behind.

Story by Jade Gurule

Comment

Comment

Backstage Theater Crew

 Photo by Reggie Quiming

Photo by Reggie Quiming

The curtain sweeps open. Lights come to life. There, in the stage, the actors begin to live up their roles. Here, behind, the true action awaits to run right. There is more to what the audience sees than the actors on the stage. Stimulating plays never comes to life without the keen and careful actions of the backstage crew. Yes, the backstage crew works as hard as the actors to make each performance beyond great. Behind those curtains are the hidden actions that turn the live story to life. Last November 3rd, 4th, and 5th, the Theatre Department released Anatomy Of Gray, a play by Jim Leonard. Junior Megan Steinhammer, the sound and lights director, and Senior Morgan Oaks, the stage and props director, speak volumes on the life behind the stage. All the management they do throughout the rehearsals and the actual play weren’t learned from theatre classes, but attained through a series of trial and error. “It’s kind of a jump into the deep end and a hope-you-know-how-to-swim kind of process,” said Oaks. Inevitably, chaos and stress take part in every rehearsal so they do their best to be on top of their game. “The more organized you are [during the rehearsals], the easier it will be during the performance,” said Steinhammer. Each of them have their own management responsibilities. Steinhammer stays up in the booth and does light cues and sound cues during the actual performance. She also calls the curtain and pre-show announcements during rehearsal. “I write down blocking and notes that have to relate to the technicians and the crew heads then I just keep a schedule and make sure we are moving along,” she explained. Oaks on the other hand assures that all the actors are in their places with their own props. “I close the curtain, move backstage props, and make sure every actor is ready. It’s a pressure [to be a stage director], when for example, if I hiccup, everyone can see or hear me and it’s like ‘Wow! that is so wrong. Glad there’s an audience there,’” she added. The rehearsal schedules depend on what week it is. For the first five to six weeks, they practice from three to five after school. But as the date comes close to the actual show, they rehearse from three to six or from three to eight after school. On top of all that, they also get loaded up with homework, tests, and projects. “From 1 to 10, our stress level would probably be 13,” Steinhammer commented. But despite of the stress they experience, they are not alone in this backstage game. There are at least 25 to 35 people in the props crew--costume heads, directors, makeup artists, sound techs, and more. And being their leader means that the crew look up to them. “It is important to learn how to be a good leader that people respect, but also not being a dictator,” Oaks remarked. While working backstage, they get a different view on the show unlike anyone in the audience. “You get to see people at their finest as they get into their character and take charge in the moment. It's a totally different perspective from just like sitting out in the audience, because out in the audience you're like ‘Wow this is sick!’ But then when you’re a part of the backstage crew, you get to see all the work that goes into it. Mr Peterson always says that actors are the walking talking props, but without all the backstage operations they would be nothing,” Steinhammer shared.

Story by Reggie Quiming and Elysia Nunez





 

Comment

Comment

Performing Arts Gala Night

November 11, 2017--the different departments of Chaparral Performing Arts united for their Annual Patrons Night. The night filled with anticipation from the patrons, the students, and teachers towards the aim to raise up to $10,000 for funding the needs of Performing Arts. The gala featured a silent auction put on by the Patrons for the Performing Arts. The night also featured performances from the Performing Arts department. "Choir, band, orchestra, guitar students, encore players, and the theatre department did small performances for the visitors,” said David Peterson, the Chair Department of Performing Arts. But before the intermissions started, booths stood along the upper hallway where pastries, coffee, and other foods were sold to the visitors who are waiting for the prepared performance in the theatre. Several guitar players also entertained them right outside the Mary Gill Theatre. Some student volunteers stood by the tables and the stairs to pose like a “human statue” which gave “a humor atmosphere to the night,” said Shel Stanfill, Orchestra and Guitar teacher. Between the intermissions, a silent auction was held in the hallways. “This is usually the main part of the fundraising. The auction includes big, little, and valuable things from the Performing Arts Department,” Stanfill said. Through the night, they sold two Anatomy of Gray signed and framed posters, four Avalanche tickets, four Disneyland Resort tickets, a Varsity Letter Jacket, and a privilege to rent a TESLA for one day. All which ranged from $50 to $600. Overall, they were able to raise $9,900. “It doesn’t really stop there because the Patrons would keep on helping us together with our own boosters,” said Stanfill. In the previous years, the Patrons had been helping the Performing Arts Department. One time was when they helped the Theatre Department in replacing the stage curtains. “That was costly and the Theatre booster couldn’t afford it without the help of Patrons,” he added. And just last year, new guitar cabinets were built in Stanfill’s guitar room, providing cabinets for students to place their guitars when they leave them in the room. “That’s why the gala night is so special for everyone in the Department--they showcase their talents for their Chaparral family while loving what they have to offer at the same time,” said Stanfill. The Gala night had been going for about seven to eight years now. “The patrons started when we had our individual booster group. It was an idea that Mr. Peterson had brought over from Eagle Crest high school. The former performing arts teachers had this idea to put a booster group that does more fundraising on a larger scale for the Performing Arts Department. So they were called the Patrons of the Performing Arts and they’re the parent groups that financially support the performing arts in ways that we can’t do,” he explained. The official website of the Patrons of the Performing Arts is found in David Peterson’s school website. Anyone could be a “Patron” and donate with just a starting amount between $10 to $50. “The amazing performances brought by every talented students wouldn’t be possible without this,” Stanfill remarked.

Comment

Comment

Band's Craft Fair

On Saturday December 2, 2017, the Chaparral High School Marching Band Boosters hosted their 13th annual Once Upon a December Craft Show. The event is used to raise money for the marching band as well as market local handmade, artisan crafts. Vendors buy booth spaces for $75-$90. Booths would also be supplied electricity if they were to choose to pay for it for just $15, although there was a limited amount and it was a first-come first-serve situation. Businesses have to fill out a form every year that includes pictures of their work and exactly what they want as to tables, booth location, etc. There were many diverse booths throughout the big gym and commons. The crafts ranged from jewelry to clothing to food, art, photography, pillows, dog treats, you name it! The event lasted all day from 9 am to 3:30 pm, with lots of visitors. A kids corner was included with lots of crafts and art projects to entertain kids while their parents shopped. A bake sale and concessions were included to help keep vendors energized, as well as add to the money raised by the whole event. On top of all the exciting booths and items to buy, there were many raffles throughout the day to help raise even more money. The Band Boosters asked each vendor to donate at least one item to the raffle to help support the band. Throughout the day, different marching band performers played holiday songs to add to the entertainment. Overall, this annual fundraiser was a fun-filled, productive day for the community, and a great start to the holiday season.

Story by Maja Walker and Kenna Vogt

Comment

Comment

DECA District 11 Conference

DECA competitors got the chance to qualify for state at the District competition on November 28th. There were 83 state qualifiers out of the 143 members that competed  from Chaparral and Chaparral won the Conference Champions title.  Districts were held at the Douglas County Fairgrounds and 4 schools competed; Legend, Douglas County, Chaparral, and Ponderosa. Chap earned the most team points in District 11 and also had the best productivity ratio of 58% of their competing members qualifying for state. Students going to the competition arrived at Chap at 6:55 AM and got on the buses to Castle Rock. Once there, they headed into the main building for the introduction and got their schedule for the day. Each student competing had a different time that they had to compete. The actual competition was held in the main building with the judges and prep time was given as well. Teams had 20 minutes to prep their roleplay and individuals had 10. When the students weren’t competing, they were in the Kirk Hall building working on homework or preparing for their roleplays. Lunch was also provided by Firehouse Subs for all of the students competing. The students were able to win two types of awards, one for qualifying for state because of a high score on their roleplay, and one for having the highest test score in the certain event they were competing in. The schools were able to win awards based on the conference champion which was the school with the highest amount of qualifiers and an award for having the most amount of participants based on size, which Douglas County won. The 83 state qualifiers will be able to go to state at the Broadmoor hotel in Colorado Spring the 25th through the 27th.

Story by Aubrey Bowlus

 


 

Comment

Comment

Pablo Picasso Exhibit

DSC_0023 copy.jpg

During the second week of November, three murals stood outside of the 300’s hallway exhibiting artwork from Pablo Picasso. Pablo was a Spanish artist who lived in Paris, France in his adult life. He created many famous pieces of artwork that had been showcased all around the world. Mrs. Adames put on an exhibit to showcase some of his work and some insightful information regarding the artist. Out of all the artists in the world, Mrs. Adames decided to share the work of Pablo Picasso. “When we think of famous artists, we think about those from hundreds of years ago but Pablo Picasso is still relevant and there aren’t very anymore,” said Spanish teacher Sue Adames. The walconsisted of three different paintings well known by Picasso such as the “Guernica” painting, “The Dream”, and “Night Fishing at The Antibes.” Adames was inspired to make the exhibit when she saw the Guernica in person. The overall goal for the Picasso exhibit was to bring new culture into the school so it could inspire students. “I wanted to bring culture into to the school in a different way, to to inspire the students to travel and do different things about the world.” Art works like this easily brings much needed culture into our school. Paintings like the Guernica that symbolises war and artworks like “The Dream” symbolizes happiness and innocence. They make people think and try their hardest to understand the meaning behind the work, and that is why painters like Pablo Picasso are so important and modern to the world. Exhibits like this bring the community together and it shows us how much we should appreciate the different art that is created in different cultures. The impact Pablo Picasso had in the art community is greater than any of us can imagine. Having seen the artwork hung on the walls really brought a different feel in the atmosphere of our school.

Story by Joey Freeburg and Zach Curtis

Comment

Comment

DCSD Election

As of November 7th, (still waiting for oversea votes) the community matters slate candidates were all elected to the Douglas County School Board of Education. This group includes Anthony Graziano, Chris Schor, Kevin Leung, and Krista Holtzmann. Kristas mission statement is as follows, “My family and I are so grateful for the partnership we have had with the many teachers and staff who were a part of Jake and Will's K-12 experience.  The educators in our children's lives helped us meet the unique needs of each of our sons and gave them opportunities to reach their full potential.   This is what every child deserves:  to have their individual needs recognized, to be given endless opportunities to learn and grow, and to be part of an educational community that prioritizes their education.  I am concerned that DCSD has strayed from that focus in recent years.  If I am elected to be a Douglas County School Board Director, my ultimate goal will be to make sure that every decision I make focuses first on how it affects the children of our District, always asking the question "Does this support the best interests of our students?".” Kevin Leung’s; “Kevin Leung knows how important it is to have a good education. His parents were illiterate and he grew up very poor. Through quality education and hard work, he now owns a successful local business and lives in a beautiful neighborhood in Douglas County for 26 years.” Chris Schor; “Partnerships between teachers and parents are our greatest assets in the education of children. Understanding the needs of all children requires strong parent partnerships. Children are successful when they have knowledgeable, passionate, caring, and supportive teachers. It is essential to recruit, develop and retain quality educators in Douglas County.” Anthony Graziano; “I am not someone who is content to sit on the sidelines. It’s time for me to step up. I am running for School Board with the promise to listen closely, understand issues and seek solutions through responsible service. I commit to working collaboratively to serve our county to ensure our public schools live up to the greatness of Douglas County.”Each of these winning candidate won by at least 15%. These four candidates have all had some kind of background in school education. The community matters slate’s main message, that won them the election, talks about refocusing on students and academic achievements, rebuilding a positive culture and climate and spending taxpayer dollars responsibly. In an interview with Vista Now’s, Gabe Barnard, Holtzmann said, “The financial policy would help the board in ensuring that money meant for the classroom reaches the classroom.” In every election, huge amounts of money go into campaigning. In this election, the four community matters candidates spent a total of $69,292.96. While an immense amount of money is spent, a massive amount is raised by the candidates as well. The candidates raised $83,470.00. According to Ballot Pedia’s article on this election, outside companies and groups also supported the winning slate; “Organizations and committees that were not connected to candidates also raised and spent funds for the board of education election. As of October 31, 2017, the Douglas Schools for Douglas Kids committee, which supported the Community Matters slate of candidates, had spent $266,422. It received $300,000 from the American Federation of Teachers and $100,000 from Citizens for Integrity earlier in the election cycle”. All of this support from all of these different groups of people, played a piece in this election. The education system relies on the help of the people to get our students the proper education system they need to thrive.

Story by Jazmyn Andre and Emerald Herman 

Comment

Comment

Letter of Intent

 Making it official. Photo by Abby Houghton.

Making it official. Photo by Abby Houghton.

As difficult as high school may seem sometimes, many students are starting to discover how valuable it can be. Many students work tirelessly throughout their high school career. They go to school early, spend their afternoons in extracurriculars, and then do it all over again the next day. Finally, these students are getting the recognition that they deserve. Five students: Hannah Ammerman, Luke Bailey, Grace Haberland, Hunter Rowe, and Megan Waldron, signed Letters of Intent on Wednesday, November 8. Hannah Ammerman was supported by almost all of the varsity volleyball team as she committed to University of Colorado Colorado Springs. She gave thanks to her family who taught her the importance of the sport. Ammerman shared tears and laughter with her team as they all stood behind her when she signed her Letter of Intent. Luke Bailey signed his for baseball, committing to St. Cloud State. Bailey thanked his teammates and his coaches when he addressed the audience. Grace Haberland committed to Augustana University for volleyball. It was easy to feel the support from her teammates and her family during the Letter of Intent Ceremony. The Chaparral Volleyball team has always seemed to have a tight bond, and this ceremony proved that. Rowe committed to CSU Pueblo playing lacrosse. His family continuously took photos of Rowe as he voiced his gratitude to his family, coaches, teammates, and God. As Megan Waldron signed her letter of intent for Southern Methodist University, tears filled her eyes, and many of her family members reciprocated her emotions. Waldron may be committed for one of the most interesting sports, equestrian. She had been involved in this sport for years, and the feeling of accomplishment spread through the room as she spoke. It was easy to see how proud her family and coaches were. The Letter of Intent Ceremony was proof that working hard can pay off in the midst of reaching big dreams.

Story by Abby Houghton

Comment

Comment

Colorado State Cross Country Championships

 Getting ready for the race to start. Photo by Matthew McCarthy

Getting ready for the race to start. Photo by Matthew McCarthy

On Saturday, October 28th, Chaparral’s Boys Cross country team ran at the Colorado High School Cross Country Championships at the Norris-Penrose Event Center, in Colorado Springs. The boys team qualified for the meet by placing fourth at the regional meet a few weeks earlier. The girls team placed 7th at the regional meet and failed to qualify for the state championships. But, Freshman runner Cassidy Hickey placed 9th at the regional meet running a 19:04 5k and had qualified as an individual runner. Chaparral ran in the 5A Boys Championship with the other top 19 teams in the state, and finished in 8th place. The team has jumped up in the rankings, failing to qualify to the state championships last year, and was ranked around 50th in the state at the start of the season, but placed 8th this year. Chaparral’s lone girl runner, Cassidy Hickey, placed 69th out of 160 runners, running a 20:02 5k. Senior and team captain Grayson Arstingstall was the first runner from Chaparral’s boys team, placing 33rd and running a 16:41 5k, he was followed by Junior Caleb Ream and Josh Welo. The team is relatively young, consisting of 3 underclassmen, and 4 upperclassmen. The team had a successful season placing in the top five teams in six meets, including winning the Fort Morgan Invitational and placing second at the UCCS Rustbuster. “The boys worked really hard this year to get to state, and we’re excited for next year,” said the boys team head coach Rob Ferguson.

Story by Matthew McCarthy

Comment

Comment

2017-2018 Senior Panel

High School is defined as a school that typically comprises grades 9-12. For some, high school is a period of four years that has tended to pass them by, meaningless. However, specifically for the 2017-2018 Senior Panel, high school has assisted in self development, and has helped them get through difficult times in their life. Designed to speak to 3 groups of 30 freshman that had opted out of the PSAT on Wednesday, October 25, Chaparral administration and counselors came together and chose each of the 12 seniors to be on this panel. Aiming for diversity in experiences, this group contained seniors that had been transfers, varsity sports players, students battling illnesses, and people who have just had a unique high school experience. On the morning of the PSAT, the freshman and the seniors gathered in the theater, and after splitting the freshman into groups of three, each group spent about an hour with the senior panel. The morning consisted of seniors giving these freshman the advice they have to offer for the next four years, and sharing their high school experience, hoping to make connections with some of the listening ears. The panel was a success. Although for some freshmen, this hour could have been an opportunity to fall asleep to the voices of 12 seniors giving them their advice, for some it was a wake up call, a way to make them feel less alone, and a way to understand that the unfamiliar thing called “Chap Fam,” truly has their back.

Story by Maci Cameron

Comment

Comment

Chaparral's Annual Sweet Street

 Kids in the community came to participate in Sweet Street. Photo by Hailey Toth

Kids in the community came to participate in Sweet Street. Photo by Hailey Toth

On October 27th all of the school clubs came together for Chaparral’s Sweet Street. Sweet Street was for little kids in the community to come to Chaparral and trick o’ treat in the cafeteria, commons, and the gym from 5:30- 7:00. The event was free, but it was encouraged to bring in non-perishable food items for the Parker Task Force and local heroes. Because of that, the members of different clubs and activities dressed up as super heroes, such as Aquaman and Spiderman. Kids were lined up from the bottom of the main staircase all the way to the 200’s hallway to go into the cafeteria and trick or treat. The children were mostly dressed up as the characters that they love, such as animals, princesses, dinosaurs, superheroes, or just relaxing in their pjs. “Sweet Street is all about giving back to the community. We’re all about trying to create a safe place for kids to go trick or treating and as a part of my project for DECA for project smiles we were just trying to spread smiles in Parker for the holiday season,” said junior Samantha Kuhns. DECA was held responsible for spreading the word to the clubs and activities to make sure that they got involved in the event. They created crafts and games and assigned all different areas for the kids to have a good time.

Story by Hailey Toth

Comment

Comment

Halloween Guidelines

Let’s admit it - even as a high school student, it can be compelling to relive the elementary school halloween party days by dressing up as your favorite fictional character, creepy clown, or anything in between. Although October 31st lands on a Tuesday this year, and dressing up may seem appropriate given the occasion, there are some restrictions and guidelines that must be followed by students that plan to suit up for school on Halloween day.

Although it is a special occasion, the general Chaparral dress code remains the same on Halloween, meaning no hats/dark glasses, no particularly disruptive garments, no clothing affiliated with any sort of vulgarity, and so forth. However, given the nature of Halloween, it is also necessary to specifically address that accessories, such as masks, concealing face paints, and fake weapons, are also banned from school on the 31st, as they would be on any other school day. The purpose behind banning such objects/accessories is to promote a safe and comfortable learning environment, and to keep all students easily identifiable in the case of an emergency/drill. Students are also discouraged from dressing in any sort of extravagant attire, which is also listed in the day-to-day dress code, as it may distract other students/teachers. In short, if planning on dressing up, be mindful of the regular dress code, as well as courteous to your fellow Wolverines!

The safest way to avoid getting dress coded on Halloween day is to use common sense when determining what to wear, and if unsure, refer to the Student Code of Conduct/Dress Code, or ask a teacher/admin for their judgement. All being said, have a safe and spooky Halloween, Chap!

Story by Hannah Wankel

Comment