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Once in a Solar Eclipse

Photo taken from twitter account @ChapHappenings

Photo taken from twitter account @ChapHappenings

Monday, August 21, 2017 was an important day in the making-- the 2017 Solar Eclipse. This is the first coast to coast solar eclipse passing through the Continental United States since February 26, 1979. People traveled all over to get the best view for the eclipse in areas of complete totality. Places along the path of complete totality experienced the height of the eclipse where in the middle the day, the sky was dark. According to estimations there were as many as 7.4 million people who traveled through Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, Georgia, and South Carolina to watch the eclipse. Some Chaparral students traveled along the paths of totality for the eclipse, but others didn't have to go as far. Most of the students that were at school Monday went outside approximately at 11:47 to catch a glimpse of the spectacular phenomenon with their classes. "My favorite part was the peak because it was unique and it's cool how our solar system works with the timing of the line up," said junior Ashley Elgin. The excitement for the eclipse was well built up for the past 38 years. "It was significant because I've always loved nature and the sun and moon," said junior Ariana Schivinski. Everyone was advised not to look at the sun directly because even though there was an eclipse, the sun that was still visible could severely damage the human eyes. Chaparral students were sure to wear their special eclipse glasses when going to watch the eclipse.  “It was a once in a lifetime experience,” said junior Nico Fuentealba. August 21, 2017 was a phenomenon that left the world anticipating the next solar eclipse in April of 2024.

Story by Erica Grotts

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The Power Behind a Wish

Chaparral.. a Place Where Dreams Come True

Chaparral.. a Place Where Dreams Come True

Wish week is one of Chaparral’s most favored week out of the year. The school comes together to make wishes come true for kids battling with a life threatening illness. This year Isabelle McAllister is Chaparral’s Wish kid. Student Government has worked for this week continuously during and after school. This week is filled with games, hope, and reward. The reward of granting many kids their wishes.

Sophomores Grace Urbanski and Katie Hogan are both involved in student government and the preparation for Wish Week.“ We have spent about the past 4 months prepping for Wish Week, almost every single day in class and outside as well,” said Urbanski. “ My favorite part of wish week is definitely the opening and closing assembly. It’s so cool to watch the school meet the kid for the first time, and it’s wonderful to see how many wishes we granted in the end. It brings the whole school together right in front of your eyes… it’s so wonderful,’ said Hogan. As homecoming and many other weeks are important for high school, the best events come with wish week because it’s not for us to put on a big show and dress up but to help others overcome their illness. “Once wish week is through, it is a huge feeling of accomplishment and pride. To see all the behind the scenes come to life is unreal,” stated Urbanski.The preparation for wish week seems really cool to outsiders, but the people who make the week what it is know that with dedication comes reward. “After wish week, my heart is full. The school comes together and everyone seems happy and willing towards one another. It’s so awesome to also see hard work pay off in the end. The best part is that you’re helping in giving kids a piece of their childhood back,” Said Hogan.

Student government has put their hearts and souls into making this week successful. Support Isabelle and student government by participating in the events and the restaurant nights.

By: Ava Houghton

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Chasing the Dream

Contestants in the Chasing the Dream 5k begin running after the opening shot. Photo by Olivia Goodman and Shayanna Spader

Contestants in the Chasing the Dream 5k begin running after the opening shot. Photo by Olivia Goodman and Shayanna Spader

On a way-hotter-than-sixty-degrees-should-be Saturday, an army of moms, dads, students, teachers, and children crowd to the starting line of the fourth annual Wish Week 5K. The wind flails around wildly while the sun cuts right through it and droplets of sweat leap from the heights of runners’ faces to land shimmering on the hot asphalt. A small girl and boy and their father clamber up a truck parked to the side of the road. Next to them sits a loudspeaker blaring Taylor Swift, Pharrell Williams, and a myriad of colorful, poppy tunes. A shimmer rustles through the crowd. Slowly, the boy raises the gun into the air and fires.

Though this Saturday offered an opportunity to get in some decent exercise, the focus remained on the family standing on the truck--more specifically the little girl, Isabelle, this year’s Make-a Wish Kid. Diagnosed with cancer, Isabelle’s wish is to spend some time at Disney World with her family and the Wish Week 5K was designed as just one of many events to raise money for the fulfillment of such a wish. Rising to the task, people of all fitness levels came together in support of Isabelle’s family.

Around a few hundred people showed up for this event, one of the first in a huge week of fundraising. Upcoming events include Movie Night, Game Night, the Dodgeball Tournament, and Sky Zone Night.

By Cole Gerome

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In It To Win It

 

Each year at Chaparral high school, bachelor's compete against one another to win over the hearts at Chaparral. With 16 contestants, four from each grade level, the boys will show off their dance moves, singing skills, and pick up lines.

On Tuesday January 10th, 2017 the show kicked off at 7:00 pm in the Chaparral theatre. As everyone sat down, the lights dimmed down on the stage and the show began. The opening started with videos the young bachelors put together to introduce themselves, and hopefully entertain the audience. After the clips were shown, the boys danced to a variation of songs with a well choreographed routine.

Next, the contestants took turns smooth talking Olayemi Ajao with pick up lines. Shortly after, a table was placed in the middle of the stage while Ava Wilson awaited for her date to arrive. Starting with the freshman, the boys arrived at their date with the intention to ruin it. After all the boys destroyed their first dates, the bachelor's moved on to performing their singing skills. From little memorization to high pitches, the boys competed for spots in the semi final round. With 6 bachelors left, they were each handed bags full of women's clothing and beauty products. In the first round the boys had to dress themselves in the clothing and apply the beauty products with the best of their ability, correctly. In the second round the bachelor's took turns coming up with a sales pitch to persuade the crowd and judges their products were the best. The final elimination for the night arrived shortly after the sales pitches. Two bachelors were eliminated from the last round, but for the first time ever a junior made it to the final competition at the sadies assembly. The finalists were, Alec Ackerman, Trent Abramovitz, Tad Trimarco, And Jacob Dedrickson. As the theatre filled with applause and laughter, the lights lit back up and the show came to an end.

The following day at the Sadies assembly, the four bachelors constructed one last performance in front of the whole school. First, Tad displayed his professional makeup skills on Gabby Garcia. In shock, the students concern grew as he painted her face, and her acrylic nails. Next, Jacob obtained a few underclassmen to act as bowling pins, while he rolled an exercise ball towards them, knocking them down. Trent, dressed in a farmer's attire and  performed the cotton eye Joe. Halfway through his performance, cheerleaders, poms, and students from the bleachers joined. Lastly, Alec instructed the school with his origami skills on how to make a paper swan. After three of the steps, Alec pulled another previously finished swan out of his pants. The winner was determined by the loudness of applause and cheering bellowed from the bleachers. As Alec’s name was called, the stomping on the bleachers increased, and the cheering roared. Alec Ackerman received the final rose, the title of Mr. Chap, and the hearts of Chaparral.

By: Ashley Nesland

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Culture Day

Kids Participating in Culture Day Activities

Kids Participating in Culture Day Activities

Last Friday, Chaparral’s foreign language honor societies held Culture Day in the commons from 2:00-4:00 pm. Students had an opportunity to experience different cultures through students who enjoy learning and teaching about them. Avery Muniz, the president of Spanish Honors Society was one of the planners of the event. “It started as a simple suggestion by Lainey Crystal that the officers decided was a great idea, then it grew as we planned which aspects of culture to represent. After that we decided it would be even more awesome to include the other honor societies as well,” Muniz said.

The event was a huge success, with students from language classes visiting and learning many new things about culture. In addition to Spanish Honors Society, Chinese and French Honors Society were also involved. “Our goal is to represent not only Latin american cultures but other countries throughout the world like China and and France as well,” Muniz added. The event included food, art displays, interactive activities, and guest speakers. “I would like to generate respect and appreciation for other cultures around the world by exposing Chap students to aspects of culture they may not know about while also fostering appreciation for diversity. Hopefully, culture day will become an annual tradition for years to come,” Muniz said.

By: Chloe Heffernan

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Trumps First Few Weeks

Donald Trump, Mike Pence, and Paul Ryan Discussing Certain Affairs 

Donald Trump, Mike Pence, and Paul Ryan Discussing Certain Affairs 

Many recent events and executive orders by Donald Trump in first few weeks of his presidency, have made headlines around the world. But, many people do not know about everything Donald Trump has done, and the impact of his decisions. Most of his decisions have been executive orders. An executive order is a legally binding order given by the President who is the head of the executive branch. An executive order is usually given to direct federal agencies in how to execute laws. During Trump’s first weeks in presidency, he has made 8 big decisions, most of them executive orders.

1. Attempt to cut down regulations on Businesses

An executive order that requests when a new regulation is proposed two other regulations will have to be specified to be dropped. Immediate Impact: No immediate impact, but  will have to wait and see what new regulations are proposed and dropped.

2. Travel Ban

The suspension of refugees for 120 days, and a cap on the number of immigrants allowed in the country. The most controversial issues include an indefinite ban on Syrian refugees, and a ban on anyone arriving from seven Muslim-majority countries (Iraq, Iran, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, and Somalia, and Libya.) A cap of 50,000 refugees total. Immediate impact: All of these were enacted immediately. This means people were immediately stopped from boarding U.S. Flights from the 7 majority Muslim  countries. Also, people who were currently on flights were detained when they were landed. As of February 6th, Trump is now facing a number of lawsuits and a federal judge has blocked the ban from going into effect.

3. Border Security

First Order: Trump has declared that the US will create "a contiguous, physical wall or other similarly secure, contiguous, and impassable physical barrier.” Second Order: The second order pledges to hire 10,000 more immigration officers, and to revoke federal grant money from "sanctuary cities" which refuse to deport undocumented immigrants. Immediate Impact: Funding from sanctuary cities stopped, and the hiring of immigration officers. But, before the wall can be built Trumps administration will need to figure out how to raise the money needed.

4. Pipeline Construction Advanced

Trump has signed two orders to advance construction of two pipelines, the Keystone XL and Dakota Access Pipeline. Trump told reporters both deals would be renegotiated, and using American steel was a requirement. The Keystone Pipeline is a 1,179-mile pipeline running from Canada to US and was halted by President Barack Obama in 2015 due to concerns over the message it would send about climate change. The second pipeline was halted last year as the Army looked at other routes, and from huge protests by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe at a North Dakota site. Immediate Impact: No immediate impact because the advance on construction of the pipelines have to be reviewed by the Army Corps of Engineers, and approved by the State Department.

5. Managing Healthcare

One of his first actions as president was to manage healthcare and obamacare. An executive order by Trump states that agencies must "waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay any portions of the Affordable Care Act that creates financial burden on states, individuals or healthcare providers.” Immediate impact: No immediate impact, because the order must pass in the House of Representatives, pass in the Senate and then be signed into law to take effect.

6. Re-instituting a ban on international abortion counseling

An executive order by Trump reinstated this policy. The policy was originally called the Mexico City policy, and was first instituted by Ronald Reagan in 1984. It prevents any foreign and non government agency or organization to receive US money for providing aid with abortion and for “providing counseling or referrals for abortion or advocating for access to abortion services in their country”. Immediate impact: Because this was an executive order by Trump, the policy only needs to written by the Secretary of State and Health and then the policy will be in effect. After this, foreign organizations will not be able to help and provide services for abortion in the U.S.

7. Federal Hiring Freeze

On Trump's first day as POTUS, he sent a directive in an executive order to Federal agencies to halt new government hiring. The freeze will not affect military spending though. Immediate Impact: The hiring freeze went into effect immediately and is expected to last around 90 days. The freeze allows some exceptions of hiring in military, public, and safety.

8. Withdrawing the U.S. from the Trans-Pacific Partnership

Trump issued an executive order that withdrew the U.S. from the TPP. The Partnership was favored by Obama during his years as President. The U.S. was not in the TPP when Trump formally withdrew the U.S. Before the U.S. could be admitted, the trade deal would have had to be approved by Congress. Immediate effect: The U.S. is immediately withdrawn, and the TPPP may fail because of the U.S. pulling out.

By: Matthew McCarthey

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Registration

Registration for upcoming 2017 Freshman, Juniors, and Seniors

Registration for upcoming 2017 Freshman, Juniors, and Seniors

Both incoming freshman and current Chaparral students have been preparing for the next school year. On January 19th, Chaparral counselors met with current Freshman, Sophomores and Juniors and talked to them about the next school year and their class selection for the next year. They also refreshed students on college and high school graduation requirements, so students can prepare themselves for classes they will have to take to get to college. “I think the meetings with counselors helped me because I was able to learn about new classes I can take next year, and I was able to think about classes I want to take in later years.” Said current freshman Josh Linero. Counselors were also available during lunch that day and talked to students one on one. Incoming Freshmen received their course selection guide with the guide of classes for the 2017-2018 school year on January 19th. On January 25th Chaparral will host incoming freshman during the Chaparral Showcase and students will learn about what their freshman year will be like, meet teachers and learn more about classes available to them. All class selection forms are due on the 27th of January and students will choose their classes in school for online verification on the 29th. The online course selection on Infinite Campus will also close at 3 P.M. on the 29th. This is the last day  Chaparral Students will receive their 2017-2018 schedules on May 16th, and incoming Freshman will receive their schedules sometime in May.

By: Matthew McCarthy

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Big Families

Duggar family from the original TV show 19 Kids and Counting 

Duggar family from the original TV show 19 Kids and Counting 

The American Dream has typically involved families having 2 children, but as the ideals have changed on what is the American Dream, the ‘norm’ of having smaller families is vanishing and the amounts of siblings is growing.

 Junior Reilly McGovern’s family consists of 8 siblings altogether, which she shares is very chaotic sometimes, yet they all have learned how to live together. “Most are moved out, but when more of us were living there it was really bad because there were only 2 bathrooms we could use.” The boys lived in the basement, while the girls lived upstairs. All 8 siblings names are Reilly, Jesse, Jenna, Justin, Ian, Ryan, Alex, Katelyn, and Amanda. “Jesse is the only blood relative to me, the others are step siblings.” A few of the siblings already have kids of their own as well. Reilly is closest with her sister Jenna. “Jenna is the one I talk to the most. She lives in the basement since the boys don’t anymore so it’s a huge room and we just hang out there all the time, talk, play xbox, and watch YouTube.”

Reilly’s family compares to the famous TV family The Duggars (from 19 Kids and Counting) with the large amount of siblings. While being very different families, what is common is the family value and the traditions that make each family unique.

By: Ally Clinard and Megan Mondragon

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Dan Brite's Return

Photo Provided by Parker Adventist Hospital

Photo Provided by Parker Adventist Hospital

On December 22nd, Detective Dan Brite was released from Craig Hospital with his family. Dan was a deputy for the Douglas County Sheriff’s department, who was shot in the line of duty on September 2nd while responding to reports of a suicidal man near Sierra Middle School. He is currently paralyzed from the waist down, and is unable to walk. He originally stayed in a local hospital, and was then transferred to Craig Hospital. He was transferred because Craig hospital specialises in spinal cord injuries. A caravan of police vehicles and ambulances escorted Dan and his family to their home in Castle Rock while people lined the streets to congratulate Dan and watch him ride home. While Dan was in the hospital, the people of Douglas County rallied together. Many different fundraisers raised over 50,000 dollars for detective Brite and his family, including a GoFundMe page, a fundraiser ran by the Coffee Cabin, an auction put on by the Cherokee Ranch and Castle Foundation, and a fundraiser by the Fallen Officers Fund.

By: Matthew McCarthy

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State Qualifiers

Photos Taken By Mrs. Mossman

Photos Taken By Mrs. Mossman

The Chaparral DECA Chapter was named the District 11 Conference Champions last Tuesday. 72 students from District 11 schools including Ponderosa, Legend, and Douglas County qualified to continue on to state. The state conference will be held in Colorado Springs at the end of February. An additional 16 students received top test scores in their respective categories, and will also move on to state. A few of the Chaparral students who received top test scores include Riley Hyvonen, Dalton Mendoza, Zachary Munn and Cambria Peterson. All of the 72 students who qualified for state had to have both their test score, and their two role play scores add together and finish in the top 20 of their category.

By: Matthew McCarthey

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Kim Ranson

Kim Ranson and Kyle Potts Speaking Over Important Points

Kim Ranson and Kyle Potts Speaking Over Important Points

The Colorado House of Representatives, has seven seats up for election in 2016. Kim Ranson is one of the candidates running for one of the seats. Campaigning for her election was priority, and this past September she visited Chaparral High school to be interviewed by senior Kyle Potts. A mass of the interview covered funding in private, and public schools. Potts asked Ranson how to keep public schools “up to speed”, funded, and well educated when competing against private schools. Ranson replied saying, “ the public schools are in good shape… back to what I said earlier about municipalities, it's also not my role as a state legislator to tell the school district how they should be determining what they want to do.” Ranson later elaborated on how she supports the parents right to send their child to the school of their choosing, “I am actually in favor of parental choice, where they feel is best suited for that child.”. Ranson was not of the candidates elected for the House of Representatives chair.

By: Hannah Lee

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Chap Fam Fund Day 1: Chillis

Chips and Salsa

Chips and Salsa

On November 15, Chillis participated in Chap Fam week by donating 20% of all earnings to the organization. Many students from Chaparral went to support the cause. Senior Danielle Miller explained, “having dinner at Chilli's was an opportunity to eat dinner with friends, while getting the chance to support our school.” Chap Fam Fund originally started as a DECA project, that has now evolved into a non profit organization designed to help students in financial stress. Chili's is one of many sponsors for the week, including other sponsors; November 17- Coldstone, Chicken Shack, and Lil' Ricci's; November 18- Fro Yo Spot and Lil' Ricci's; November 19- Lil' Ricci's.

By: Audrey Hart

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Rough and Tough

Teachers Take the Win in Rough and Tough Showdown 

Teachers Take the Win in Rough and Tough Showdown 

    On Wednesday, the 27th of October, Chaparral students gathered in the main gym at 6 o'clock to compete in the annual "Rough and Tough" volleyball tournament. 13 teams participated in the event which was put on by student government. Each team was required to donate 50 cans towards the canned food drive.  


    “I thought it was a good event, it was very well organized and it was a fun bonding experience,” said freshman Colin Hayes, a member of the Powerpuff Team.

    Team names included Team Brick, Sexy Salamanders, School of Block, Team 2121, and Hot Piece of Ace. The winning team won a golden volleyball and bragging rights.

    The event lasted around three hours. The championship match came down to School of Block and Fuego. School of Block; comprised of a group of Chaparral teachers, won the match and its members were crowned as champions.

By: Matthew McCarthey

 

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Together We Can

Give A Can Get A Can

Give A Can Get A Can

Every year, the Chaparral family joins together to donate cans to the Parker Task Force. The annual Food Drive started October 24 and ended on November 4. Goods include everything from cans to bottled soap and diapers. “They don’t have to be just food items, a lot of the donations are basically daily essentials that people need,” said Alex Lehman, Senior Class President in Student Government.

Most cans and other dry food items were donated through fourth period classes. Some classes offered extra credit or other incentives for bringing in a number of cans. Fortunately, the Food Drive landed right on Halloween week, making it so students were then able to go trick or canning versus trick or treating. Students simply went door to door asking for unused cans rather than candy. This was a fun and creative way to support the Parker community.

As of November 3rd, Adames fourth period class leads with 849.5 cans with Finnefrock close behind. Chaparral bringing together 20,542 cans in total.

By: Lauren DiNapoli

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Fascination with Communication

Communication is a skill that people have mastered by high school. People can use motor skills, such as body language and talking to communicate with one another. However, not everyone has the same way of communicating, which can cause interaction to be hard for some people. A few of the special needs students use sign to communicate and their peer coaches don’t have the education of sign language like the students do.

Unified Soccer Coach and PE Teacher, Lori Pace, has worked with special needs students and understands their struggle of effectively communicating with others. Pace and her peer coaches grouped together to think of goals they wish to accomplish for the end of the year. One of the ideas was to establish better communication with the special needs students, so Pace came up with the idea to start a fundraiser for cChromebooks. With these cChromebooks, the Peer Coaches are hoping to “not only learn sign language but also alternative conversation as some of the students use different forms of language,” said Pace. In order to utilize the technology, they need 3,000 dollars to purchase minimum of 6 Chromebooks. Pace said, “After further conversation regarding our efforts with the SSN teachers we learned they would largely appreciate the opportunity to utilize them up in their classrooms throughout the day to support their diverse learning needs.”

If they are to surpass their goal of 3,000 dollars, they plan to plant the money in the Unified Sports account to help benefit the students in that area of their lives as well. This fundraiser will gift Chaparral students with effective conversation between each other. Please donate to the following link to support the Chaparral Peer Coaches and special needs students. https://app.snap-raise.com/fundraisers/16296/participant/500047?share_type=twitter

By: Ava Houghton

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Check the Disrespect

 A Student Focused on Technology in the Classroom

 A Student Focused on Technology in the Classroom

As kids, we were taught to respect elders and people in authority. In the school setting, that includes all teachers and administrators. However, some students seem to have never heard anything like this, and so choose to disrespect their teachers. Teachers have a simple job: to teach students material and make sure they understand it. They don’t deserve to deal with rude students that try to make their lives difficult. Students who take their future in consideration don’t deserve to learn in a negative environment.

Educators don’t pick on students just out of boredom or bias, they single an individual out to discipline them and make sure the learning environment stays focused. Students who disrespect teachers are extremely inconsiderate. This is not only to the teacher, but to other people in the classroom. Students are at school to learn, not to hear their classmates talk back to the their educator. Alas, verbal disrespect is not the end of it.

Phones are a rather big issue. There’s been a consistent problem with students constantly on their phones during class and not paying attention to the teacher lecturing. This is a sign of disrespect in the fact that the students totally disregard what a teacher has to say, as if they don’t care at all. The worst part of this is if a student refuses to hand over the phone when specifically requested by faculty. Students will put their phone away temporarily, only to have it out again a few minutes later. This attitude is that of one who doesn’t think a teacher should ever tell them what to do. These are people who typically think they can do anything, and no adult has the right to tell them otherwise. The sad thing is, some educators just give up trying to help the students. There is so much effort put into trying to help the students, energy that could be used towards teaching, that those efforts are disregarded. Teachers have used so much wasted attempt that it seems futile to try any more.

Not all students are like this, the majority are well mannered and respectful in class. Faculty should, in the face of disrespect, keep their cool and remain respectful. Teachers also should not just ignore the contempt from students; they should try to strictly combat it. Being too lenient doesn’t work, and will only make things worse, as students don’t see a limit to their actions. The classroom should not be a stage for a power struggle between student and teacher. What happened to respect? We need to speak up and bring it back. Educators, or anyone for that matter, don’t deserve rude treatment being given in today’s school environment.

By: Lauren DiNapoli

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Expanding Horizons

Hotel Denver on Seventeenth Street

Hotel Denver on Seventeenth Street

Each year the DECA organization prepares for students from all over Colorado to compete against other schools. This year, around 90 students from Chaparral traveled to the scenic Glenwood Springs to take home the traveling trophy once again. At 7:00 a.m. Students departed Chaparral on the road to victory. On the way, Chaparral stopped at Mimi's Cafe for a delicious chapter breakfast. During the three hour bus ride up, students bonded by singing songs, handing out portfolios with advice, and playing telephone. “The advice was really helpful, the portfolio contained a lot of information on how to make our role plays run more smoothly,” said sophomore Maria Zavaras. When arriving at the phenomenal Hotel Denver, everyone had a chance to explore the town. Although the town was under construction, the memories made were unforgettable. Later, everyone walked over to Hotel Colorado to take the first nerve racking test. The next day the competitions were being held at Hotel Colorado. "I was nervous at first, but as soon as I finished my first role play I was ready for the next one," said sophomore Sydney Fisher. The day ran very smoothly, everyone was able to get to their role plays and find lunch. At awards, Chaparral had students placing left and right. The applause and cheering filled the room. Overall, Chaparral took home the traveling trophy along with the Chaparral pride.

By: Ashley Nesland

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All Laughs With the Rumor's Cast

Rumors Cast Smiling Their Best

Rumors Cast Smiling Their Best

Looking for a night of pure entertainment? Come experience the emotion with Chaparral’s first play Rumors by Neil Simon. Simon writes his plays from his own experiences, but unlike his other pieces Rumors is relentless in its needs for plot twists, and to keep the comedy going. Rumors is a farce; a comic dramatic work using buffoonery and horseplay that typically includes crude, characterization, and ludicrously improbable situations. “A farce is a hard play to write. But it makes for a great play to perform and watch,” stated by junior Chloe Cherro. The theatrical Wolverines of Chaparral will be performing this on November 3,4, and 5 in the Auditorium next to the main entrance. It costs only $7 for students and $10 for adults to witness all the hard work and passion of the cast, as they invite the audience into their world. Rumors is “a comedy about a fancy dinner party, where a bunch of crazy stuff happens,” said Cherro. “Each and every student participating in Rumors gets to do what they love in an environment fit for them, able to share their hard work and talent,” said Cherro. Don't miss out on all the talent at Chaparral, buy your ticket and secure your spot at this year’s first play.

By: Lauren DiNapoli

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Teach at Southeast

Stephanie Clarkson's Kiddos Showing Southeast Pride

Stephanie Clarkson's Kiddos Showing Southeast Pride

Laughter, goofiness, and joy are three words that explain the energy felt when volunteering with children at Southeast. Southeast is constantly taking in volunteers to support and reach out to the surrounding community, that needs a place to call home.

“It’s important to have a staff of children [and adults] to help disciple people [in need], and help walk them closer to God,” said Early Childhood Director, Stephanie Clarkson. Clarkson has worked at Southeast for about four and a half years, but worked with the preschoolers for only a year and a half. Clarkson enjoys the atmosphere given by the preschool age group, and adores seeing them grow physically and emotionally. They are able to develop a personality and recognize their own opinions. “..when they can walk out of the classroom and be excited [about] telling their parents the stories they’ve learned; it’s always brought..excitement to my life,” said Clarkson.

Volunteering is a simple process that takes around 2 to 3 days if one is a teenager. “Our website is the best place [to start]. [Southeast has]...the email addresses from all the staff members that work [here]. [ Also, volunteers] are always welcome to come into the church and ask any of us...we all have different areas of community service that we can allow people to be apart of,” said Clarkson. The process consists of extensive background checks, risk management, and clarification of the church’s rules. This ensures that people will abide by the rules given, and that children's safety is the top priority. Volunteering at Southeast will allow one to give back in the community in a small but impactful way. Don’t underestimate this opportunity, and take it.

By: Allie Cummings

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Take Ownership of Your Scholarship!

CollegeBoard keeping students informed 

CollegeBoard keeping students informed 

Moving on from high school can be an enormous, frightening experience for young adults to make. For many, the next step in life is college; an exhilarating, yet stressful change in one's life. Preparing for college is important, and many factors can be put into place to make the process more efficient and cheaper. One way to lessen college expenses is by applying for scholarships. Thousands of scholarships are provided and are fit for every single person. Institutional scholarships are provided from the school, and in some cases given through admissions. “The best type of scholarships is always through the school, they are the ones that will offer you the most amount of money,” said counselor Mary J. Pook. Outside scholarships can be provided as well. Anyone can apply for a scholarship, for those who are a certain height, eye color, or just for the type of scholarship one applies for. "You can apply for scholarships through a lottery, send in a video, or write an essay depending on what the school is looking for," said Pook. Scholarships can be applied through admissions or on various websites like Naviance or collegeboard.org. Additional assistance can come from the counseling office. “I have a book full of scholarships and scholarship opportunities that I receive that I send out through a newsletter,” said Pook. Scholarships are usually sent to schools after the holidays and seniors should start applying closer to second semester. Applying for scholarships is the next big step on opening doors to an amazing, independent future.

By: Ashley Nesland

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