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DCSD Election

As of November 7th, (still waiting for oversea votes) the community matters slate candidates were all elected to the Douglas County School Board of Education. This group includes Anthony Graziano, Chris Schor, Kevin Leung, and Krista Holtzmann. Kristas mission statement is as follows, “My family and I are so grateful for the partnership we have had with the many teachers and staff who were a part of Jake and Will's K-12 experience.  The educators in our children's lives helped us meet the unique needs of each of our sons and gave them opportunities to reach their full potential.   This is what every child deserves:  to have their individual needs recognized, to be given endless opportunities to learn and grow, and to be part of an educational community that prioritizes their education.  I am concerned that DCSD has strayed from that focus in recent years.  If I am elected to be a Douglas County School Board Director, my ultimate goal will be to make sure that every decision I make focuses first on how it affects the children of our District, always asking the question "Does this support the best interests of our students?".” Kevin Leung’s; “Kevin Leung knows how important it is to have a good education. His parents were illiterate and he grew up very poor. Through quality education and hard work, he now owns a successful local business and lives in a beautiful neighborhood in Douglas County for 26 years.” Chris Schor; “Partnerships between teachers and parents are our greatest assets in the education of children. Understanding the needs of all children requires strong parent partnerships. Children are successful when they have knowledgeable, passionate, caring, and supportive teachers. It is essential to recruit, develop and retain quality educators in Douglas County.” Anthony Graziano; “I am not someone who is content to sit on the sidelines. It’s time for me to step up. I am running for School Board with the promise to listen closely, understand issues and seek solutions through responsible service. I commit to working collaboratively to serve our county to ensure our public schools live up to the greatness of Douglas County.”Each of these winning candidate won by at least 15%. These four candidates have all had some kind of background in school education. The community matters slate’s main message, that won them the election, talks about refocusing on students and academic achievements, rebuilding a positive culture and climate and spending taxpayer dollars responsibly. In an interview with Vista Now’s, Gabe Barnard, Holtzmann said, “The financial policy would help the board in ensuring that money meant for the classroom reaches the classroom.” In every election, huge amounts of money go into campaigning. In this election, the four community matters candidates spent a total of $69,292.96. While an immense amount of money is spent, a massive amount is raised by the candidates as well. The candidates raised $83,470.00. According to Ballot Pedia’s article on this election, outside companies and groups also supported the winning slate; “Organizations and committees that were not connected to candidates also raised and spent funds for the board of education election. As of October 31, 2017, the Douglas Schools for Douglas Kids committee, which supported the Community Matters slate of candidates, had spent $266,422. It received $300,000 from the American Federation of Teachers and $100,000 from Citizens for Integrity earlier in the election cycle”. All of this support from all of these different groups of people, played a piece in this election. The education system relies on the help of the people to get our students the proper education system they need to thrive.

Story by Jazmyn Andre and Emerald Herman 

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Letter of Intent

Making it official. Photo by Abby Houghton.

Making it official. Photo by Abby Houghton.

As difficult as high school may seem sometimes, many students are starting to discover how valuable it can be. Many students work tirelessly throughout their high school career. They go to school early, spend their afternoons in extracurriculars, and then do it all over again the next day. Finally, these students are getting the recognition that they deserve. Five students: Hannah Ammerman, Luke Bailey, Grace Haberland, Hunter Rowe, and Megan Waldron, signed Letters of Intent on Wednesday, November 8. Hannah Ammerman was supported by almost all of the varsity volleyball team as she committed to University of Colorado Colorado Springs. She gave thanks to her family who taught her the importance of the sport. Ammerman shared tears and laughter with her team as they all stood behind her when she signed her Letter of Intent. Luke Bailey signed his for baseball, committing to St. Cloud State. Bailey thanked his teammates and his coaches when he addressed the audience. Grace Haberland committed to Augustana University for volleyball. It was easy to feel the support from her teammates and her family during the Letter of Intent Ceremony. The Chaparral Volleyball team has always seemed to have a tight bond, and this ceremony proved that. Rowe committed to CSU Pueblo playing lacrosse. His family continuously took photos of Rowe as he voiced his gratitude to his family, coaches, teammates, and God. As Megan Waldron signed her letter of intent for Southern Methodist University, tears filled her eyes, and many of her family members reciprocated her emotions. Waldron may be committed for one of the most interesting sports, equestrian. She had been involved in this sport for years, and the feeling of accomplishment spread through the room as she spoke. It was easy to see how proud her family and coaches were. The Letter of Intent Ceremony was proof that working hard can pay off in the midst of reaching big dreams.

Story by Abby Houghton

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Colorado State Cross Country Championships

Getting ready for the race to start. Photo by Matthew McCarthy

Getting ready for the race to start. Photo by Matthew McCarthy

On Saturday, October 28th, Chaparral’s Boys Cross country team ran at the Colorado High School Cross Country Championships at the Norris-Penrose Event Center, in Colorado Springs. The boys team qualified for the meet by placing fourth at the regional meet a few weeks earlier. The girls team placed 7th at the regional meet and failed to qualify for the state championships. But, Freshman runner Cassidy Hickey placed 9th at the regional meet running a 19:04 5k and had qualified as an individual runner. Chaparral ran in the 5A Boys Championship with the other top 19 teams in the state, and finished in 8th place. The team has jumped up in the rankings, failing to qualify to the state championships last year, and was ranked around 50th in the state at the start of the season, but placed 8th this year. Chaparral’s lone girl runner, Cassidy Hickey, placed 69th out of 160 runners, running a 20:02 5k. Senior and team captain Grayson Arstingstall was the first runner from Chaparral’s boys team, placing 33rd and running a 16:41 5k, he was followed by Junior Caleb Ream and Josh Welo. The team is relatively young, consisting of 3 underclassmen, and 4 upperclassmen. The team had a successful season placing in the top five teams in six meets, including winning the Fort Morgan Invitational and placing second at the UCCS Rustbuster. “The boys worked really hard this year to get to state, and we’re excited for next year,” said the boys team head coach Rob Ferguson.

Story by Matthew McCarthy

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2017-2018 Senior Panel

High School is defined as a school that typically comprises grades 9-12. For some, high school is a period of four years that has tended to pass them by, meaningless. However, specifically for the 2017-2018 Senior Panel, high school has assisted in self development, and has helped them get through difficult times in their life. Designed to speak to 3 groups of 30 freshman that had opted out of the PSAT on Wednesday, October 25, Chaparral administration and counselors came together and chose each of the 12 seniors to be on this panel. Aiming for diversity in experiences, this group contained seniors that had been transfers, varsity sports players, students battling illnesses, and people who have just had a unique high school experience. On the morning of the PSAT, the freshman and the seniors gathered in the theater, and after splitting the freshman into groups of three, each group spent about an hour with the senior panel. The morning consisted of seniors giving these freshman the advice they have to offer for the next four years, and sharing their high school experience, hoping to make connections with some of the listening ears. The panel was a success. Although for some freshmen, this hour could have been an opportunity to fall asleep to the voices of 12 seniors giving them their advice, for some it was a wake up call, a way to make them feel less alone, and a way to understand that the unfamiliar thing called “Chap Fam,” truly has their back.

Story by Maci Cameron

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Chaparral's Annual Sweet Street

Kids in the community came to participate in Sweet Street. Photo by Hailey Toth

Kids in the community came to participate in Sweet Street. Photo by Hailey Toth

On October 27th all of the school clubs came together for Chaparral’s Sweet Street. Sweet Street was for little kids in the community to come to Chaparral and trick o’ treat in the cafeteria, commons, and the gym from 5:30- 7:00. The event was free, but it was encouraged to bring in non-perishable food items for the Parker Task Force and local heroes. Because of that, the members of different clubs and activities dressed up as super heroes, such as Aquaman and Spiderman. Kids were lined up from the bottom of the main staircase all the way to the 200’s hallway to go into the cafeteria and trick or treat. The children were mostly dressed up as the characters that they love, such as animals, princesses, dinosaurs, superheroes, or just relaxing in their pjs. “Sweet Street is all about giving back to the community. We’re all about trying to create a safe place for kids to go trick or treating and as a part of my project for DECA for project smiles we were just trying to spread smiles in Parker for the holiday season,” said junior Samantha Kuhns. DECA was held responsible for spreading the word to the clubs and activities to make sure that they got involved in the event. They created crafts and games and assigned all different areas for the kids to have a good time.

Story by Hailey Toth

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Halloween Guidelines

Let’s admit it - even as a high school student, it can be compelling to relive the elementary school halloween party days by dressing up as your favorite fictional character, creepy clown, or anything in between. Although October 31st lands on a Tuesday this year, and dressing up may seem appropriate given the occasion, there are some restrictions and guidelines that must be followed by students that plan to suit up for school on Halloween day.

Although it is a special occasion, the general Chaparral dress code remains the same on Halloween, meaning no hats/dark glasses, no particularly disruptive garments, no clothing affiliated with any sort of vulgarity, and so forth. However, given the nature of Halloween, it is also necessary to specifically address that accessories, such as masks, concealing face paints, and fake weapons, are also banned from school on the 31st, as they would be on any other school day. The purpose behind banning such objects/accessories is to promote a safe and comfortable learning environment, and to keep all students easily identifiable in the case of an emergency/drill. Students are also discouraged from dressing in any sort of extravagant attire, which is also listed in the day-to-day dress code, as it may distract other students/teachers. In short, if planning on dressing up, be mindful of the regular dress code, as well as courteous to your fellow Wolverines!

The safest way to avoid getting dress coded on Halloween day is to use common sense when determining what to wear, and if unsure, refer to the Student Code of Conduct/Dress Code, or ask a teacher/admin for their judgement. All being said, have a safe and spooky Halloween, Chap!

Story by Hannah Wankel

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National Honors Society

Principal Greg Gotchey addressing the audience and new NHS inductees. Photo by Reggie Quiming.

Principal Greg Gotchey addressing the audience and new NHS inductees. Photo by Reggie Quiming.

September 25, 2017--Chaparral’s National Honors Society inducted ninety five juniors as this year’s new members of the organization. Students, parents, and teachers gathered in the Mary Gill Theatre and witnessed the recognition of achievements of the inductees over the course of their two years in high school. These new members are joining the current ninety-nine members for this school year. At 7:00 pm, Chaparral’s Principal Greg Gotchey officially opened the ceremony, welcoming the visitors and the inductees. He recognized the members as the “pride of Chaparral,” emphasizing how proud he is of the new members. After the introduction, the officers of NHS gave an overview of the virtues of an NHS member, which are Scholarship, Leadership, Service, and Character. “Scholarship is for having the GPA; leadership, is being involved in serving our community, and then on top of that, doing all of it with good character and integrity,” NHS adviser and math teacher Laura Bockhacker said. The traditional ceremony included the lighting of candles that represent each virtue. The new members then walked up the stage and received their respective certificates and congratulations from the principal, teachers, and NHS officers. “[NHS] is a celebration of how much they excel in so many things--scholarship,  leadership, and service--being huge parts of the organization,” Bockhacker remarked. NHS has been in Chaparral for a long time, continuing to recognize the academic capacities of students. More so, it is an organization that “serves the Chaparral community and feeder areas--the whole Chaparral family in general,” Bockhacker said. NHS conducts their community services in and out of school, usually in Chaparral’s feeder schools, both Elementary and Middle Schools. They volunteer on feeder-related activities and tutoring of the students all the way through Elementary students. “Aside from their community services, we will also do the blood drive again as a big part of their project this year,” Bockhacker added. Members of NHS are available for tutoring in Chaparral as well. Tutors will be in the library, the Vogel Academic Support Center, and Star Lab. “Students can just show up, for example, in the Library and tell Mr. Larson. Let him know that you need a tutor or just look for a green sign on one of the tables. They’re usually there, sitting and waiting,” Bockhacker explained. One of the new members of NHS, Junior Haley Morris, said that “being in NHS is a privilege, a responsibility in the community, and a leadership role. It allows you to take time to serve.” Each new member needs to take at least twelve hours to do community services and six hours of tutoring. “It’s a challenge, especially because there is more schoolwork now that I’m a Junior compared to before. It is nice to help my fellow students and Chap,” Morris added.

Story by Reggie Quiming

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The Race Is On

Super Fans running the flags. Photo by Paige Wiebelhaus

Super Fans running the flags. Photo by Paige Wiebelhaus

Every high school in Colorado likes to think they have the best student fans. Many schools also have designated Super Fans who run their fan section. These Super Fans lead the cheers at sporting events and often are the ones who get the entire crowd hyped and involved. In order to do this the Super Fans, themselves, must be energetic and excited. “To get hype before each game, it all comes from within my mentality,” senior Ryan Crothers explains. The Super Fans of these high schools have many different tasks that they much achieve at each and every sporting event. One of these tasks is working together with another group of students (at Chaparral this group is Red Blue Crew) to create cheers for the student section to do. “Cheers usually are picked moments before we do them so it’s usually an on the spot thing,” senior Charlie Beller states, “we all discuss it and then someone just does it.” Colorado High School Activities Association, also known as CHSAA, has created a contest to see which high school truly has the best Super Fans who get their student section the most rowdy. #BackMyTeam is a way for high schools to be recognized for their efforts of getting their student body engaged at games. This was created to encourage the support for sports teams and good sportsmanship in high school athletics. In order to enter the competition, the school administration or team account must post a photo, video, or both on Twitter using the hashtag and tag the official CHSAA account. If the post is from a personal account, the post will not be entered into the contest. This competition is held seasonally. This means that fall sports, winter sports, and spring sports are in separate competitions for the finest supporters. Each winner will be recognized at some of the biggest sporting events of the season and will also obtain an award for their athletic department. The fall winners will be announced at the 4A/5A football championships on December 2, after a week-long voting poll of the top 3 student sections. The top school of the winter competition will be broadcasted to the public at the state basketball game on March 10th. The victors of the spring season will be recognized at the state track race, which occurs on May 19. For more information about contest dates and details visit http://chsaanow.com/backmyteam/ or http://chsaanow.com/2017-08-24/chsaa-launches-backmyteam-sportsmanship-school-spirit-contest-student-sections/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter . These websites also have all polling dates as well as general information. In order to end up on top in this competition, the school must stand apart from all others. “I think what makes Chap’s student section different is that Chap has students that love their student athletes,” senior Ally Schlegel describes, “they love being at games, they love our school, they love getting hype, they love everything about it and that just makes the experience so much better considering everyone is truly enjoying the moments we get at sporting events.” With the long road ahead, and this competition just beginning, Colorado high schools are continuously battling for the title of the greatest Super Fans in the state.

Story by Paige Wiebelhaus

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Chaparral's Mini Cheers

Gianna practicing her tumbling skills; picture approved by mother Yvonne Lens. Photo by Lauren Collins

Gianna practicing her tumbling skills; picture approved by mother Yvonne Lens. Photo by Lauren Collins

Chaparral holds many camps for the community’s youth throughout the year. On September 30th, Chaparral Cheer hosted kindergarten through 8th graders at the Cheer Mini Clinic. This clinic gives these little girls a chance to become a cheerleader alongside the varsity cheerleaders of Chaparral. “The mini clinic is a long standing tradition that allows cheerleaders from Chaparral to connect with children of the community and build a bond with future Wolverines,” cheer coach Heather Saunders stated. This is also beneficial to the children at the camp because they get a feel for what the cheer program is like at Chaparral as well as the Chap Family itself. This clinic gives the children the opportunity to practice tumbling, flying, and other cheer skills with the members of Chaparral cheer. There are different groups led by different cheerleaders based on the skill set level of the younger kids. This is very similar to the break down at tryouts for JV and Varsity. The children spent the entire day at Chaparral practicing their skills and getting better. They even made a routine that they performed for their parents at the end of the day. The camp included lunch and t-shirts for the girls, along with other fun activities in order to make the children feel part of the cheer teams. Although most of the camp is about having fun, there are a few challenges when it comes to teaching the girls. “The most difficult part about the camp is keeping the girls focused,” junior Morgan Sprinkle explained. “Some things take a little while to teach, such as the dance they perform, and they want to move on to the cool stuff like stunting so they get distracted.” The goal that Chaparral sets out to achieve with this camp is “to get [the kids] involved in the community and support the community,” said Sprinkle. This camp has been a popular event among future Chaparral Wolverines because “most of the girls love to cheer and think it’s the coolest thing ever. When I was little I absolutely loved these camps and begged my mom to sign me up,” Sprinkle explained. This trend seemed to carry through to the attendees of the camp this year. “My favorite part of the camp is the cheer at the game on Friday,” attendee Ali explains. This camp sets out to embody the spirit of Chaparral as a school and community while getting the younger children involved.

Story by Lauren Collins and Paige Wiebelhaus

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The Next Four Years: How You Can Make an Impact

Some members running to be a part of the Douglas County School Board. Photo by Devon Williams

Some members running to be a part of the Douglas County School Board. Photo by Devon Williams

Do you care about your school, your district, and what happens within your school? If so, more than 1,500 people agree with you. It’s the Douglas County Parents, founded in 2013. Since 2013, there have been approximately 20-25 meetings including Next 4 Years and house parties. You may be wondering what they do. Well, they want to make the school a better place for learning and an even better district for you. The Douglas County Parents aims to inform the community about the issues within the district and how they’re addressing the issues. Board member and parent of two kids in the district, Patti Hickey told more about what the Douglas County parents discuss in meetings, she said “We discuss how we got to where we are today going back several years, we discuss what is happening currently and we discuss what’s next for our schools. We also talk about what we can do to help get the word out.” The meetings are a time for parents to understand more about the school district, become better informed, and ask their questions. The meetings are important for everyone to attend, parent Shaun Sindelman who has twin boys in 2nd grade at Prairie Crossing Elementary says about this subject, “I feel these meetings are important for everyone in the district to attend, whether they are a parent or not, simply because as residents of Douglas County, we ALL have a responsibility to make sure that the children that live in the district and attend schools in the district have a proper education from well-paid teachers in buildings with proper accommodations for those students to learn in the best way possible.” The decisions that the board of education makes can highly impact your everyday life, so the Douglas County Parents gives ways to take action such as sending an email to the board, attend a board meeting, or specific volunteer opportunities. You may be asking yourself, how does this relate to me? Isn’t this just for parents, do I have a voice in this? Why does this matter? I continued to talk with parent and board member Hickey about why these meetings could be important to students and why students should attend, she said “First off, if there are students that are 18 years old, they need to make sure they are registered and get out the vote to their peers! Our meetings are open to the public and all students are welcome to attend. It’s important that they understand how the school board works and that the decisions that are made at the district level impact them everyday in their classrooms, from the curriculum being taught to the very teacher that stands before them.” So If you’re 18, you have the opportunity to vote, and you could attend meetings if you’re not able to vote. This is a great way to get your voice out there, get educated about what happens to DCSD schools, and leave with more understanding as well as the possibility to make an impact. Students have to start caring about their district too because this is affects us all and it will continue to affect us until something is changed.

Story by Devon Williams

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Once in a Solar Eclipse

Photo taken from twitter account @ChapHappenings

Photo taken from twitter account @ChapHappenings

Monday, August 21, 2017 was an important day in the making-- the 2017 Solar Eclipse. This is the first coast to coast solar eclipse passing through the Continental United States since February 26, 1979. People traveled all over to get the best view for the eclipse in areas of complete totality. Places along the path of complete totality experienced the height of the eclipse where in the middle the day, the sky was dark. According to estimations there were as many as 7.4 million people who traveled through Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, Georgia, and South Carolina to watch the eclipse. Some Chaparral students traveled along the paths of totality for the eclipse, but others didn't have to go as far. Most of the students that were at school Monday went outside approximately at 11:47 to catch a glimpse of the spectacular phenomenon with their classes. "My favorite part was the peak because it was unique and it's cool how our solar system works with the timing of the line up," said junior Ashley Elgin. The excitement for the eclipse was well built up for the past 38 years. "It was significant because I've always loved nature and the sun and moon," said junior Ariana Schivinski. Everyone was advised not to look at the sun directly because even though there was an eclipse, the sun that was still visible could severely damage the human eyes. Chaparral students were sure to wear their special eclipse glasses when going to watch the eclipse.  “It was a once in a lifetime experience,” said junior Nico Fuentealba. August 21, 2017 was a phenomenon that left the world anticipating the next solar eclipse in April of 2024.

Story by Erica Grotts

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The Power Behind a Wish

Chaparral.. a Place Where Dreams Come True

Chaparral.. a Place Where Dreams Come True

Wish week is one of Chaparral’s most favored week out of the year. The school comes together to make wishes come true for kids battling with a life threatening illness. This year Isabelle McAllister is Chaparral’s Wish kid. Student Government has worked for this week continuously during and after school. This week is filled with games, hope, and reward. The reward of granting many kids their wishes.

Sophomores Grace Urbanski and Katie Hogan are both involved in student government and the preparation for Wish Week.“ We have spent about the past 4 months prepping for Wish Week, almost every single day in class and outside as well,” said Urbanski. “ My favorite part of wish week is definitely the opening and closing assembly. It’s so cool to watch the school meet the kid for the first time, and it’s wonderful to see how many wishes we granted in the end. It brings the whole school together right in front of your eyes… it’s so wonderful,’ said Hogan. As homecoming and many other weeks are important for high school, the best events come with wish week because it’s not for us to put on a big show and dress up but to help others overcome their illness. “Once wish week is through, it is a huge feeling of accomplishment and pride. To see all the behind the scenes come to life is unreal,” stated Urbanski.The preparation for wish week seems really cool to outsiders, but the people who make the week what it is know that with dedication comes reward. “After wish week, my heart is full. The school comes together and everyone seems happy and willing towards one another. It’s so awesome to also see hard work pay off in the end. The best part is that you’re helping in giving kids a piece of their childhood back,” Said Hogan.

Student government has put their hearts and souls into making this week successful. Support Isabelle and student government by participating in the events and the restaurant nights.

By: Ava Houghton

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Chasing the Dream

Contestants in the Chasing the Dream 5k begin running after the opening shot. Photo by Olivia Goodman and Shayanna Spader

Contestants in the Chasing the Dream 5k begin running after the opening shot. Photo by Olivia Goodman and Shayanna Spader

On a way-hotter-than-sixty-degrees-should-be Saturday, an army of moms, dads, students, teachers, and children crowd to the starting line of the fourth annual Wish Week 5K. The wind flails around wildly while the sun cuts right through it and droplets of sweat leap from the heights of runners’ faces to land shimmering on the hot asphalt. A small girl and boy and their father clamber up a truck parked to the side of the road. Next to them sits a loudspeaker blaring Taylor Swift, Pharrell Williams, and a myriad of colorful, poppy tunes. A shimmer rustles through the crowd. Slowly, the boy raises the gun into the air and fires.

Though this Saturday offered an opportunity to get in some decent exercise, the focus remained on the family standing on the truck--more specifically the little girl, Isabelle, this year’s Make-a Wish Kid. Diagnosed with cancer, Isabelle’s wish is to spend some time at Disney World with her family and the Wish Week 5K was designed as just one of many events to raise money for the fulfillment of such a wish. Rising to the task, people of all fitness levels came together in support of Isabelle’s family.

Around a few hundred people showed up for this event, one of the first in a huge week of fundraising. Upcoming events include Movie Night, Game Night, the Dodgeball Tournament, and Sky Zone Night.

By Cole Gerome

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In It To Win It

 

Each year at Chaparral high school, bachelor's compete against one another to win over the hearts at Chaparral. With 16 contestants, four from each grade level, the boys will show off their dance moves, singing skills, and pick up lines.

On Tuesday January 10th, 2017 the show kicked off at 7:00 pm in the Chaparral theatre. As everyone sat down, the lights dimmed down on the stage and the show began. The opening started with videos the young bachelors put together to introduce themselves, and hopefully entertain the audience. After the clips were shown, the boys danced to a variation of songs with a well choreographed routine.

Next, the contestants took turns smooth talking Olayemi Ajao with pick up lines. Shortly after, a table was placed in the middle of the stage while Ava Wilson awaited for her date to arrive. Starting with the freshman, the boys arrived at their date with the intention to ruin it. After all the boys destroyed their first dates, the bachelor's moved on to performing their singing skills. From little memorization to high pitches, the boys competed for spots in the semi final round. With 6 bachelors left, they were each handed bags full of women's clothing and beauty products. In the first round the boys had to dress themselves in the clothing and apply the beauty products with the best of their ability, correctly. In the second round the bachelor's took turns coming up with a sales pitch to persuade the crowd and judges their products were the best. The final elimination for the night arrived shortly after the sales pitches. Two bachelors were eliminated from the last round, but for the first time ever a junior made it to the final competition at the sadies assembly. The finalists were, Alec Ackerman, Trent Abramovitz, Tad Trimarco, And Jacob Dedrickson. As the theatre filled with applause and laughter, the lights lit back up and the show came to an end.

The following day at the Sadies assembly, the four bachelors constructed one last performance in front of the whole school. First, Tad displayed his professional makeup skills on Gabby Garcia. In shock, the students concern grew as he painted her face, and her acrylic nails. Next, Jacob obtained a few underclassmen to act as bowling pins, while he rolled an exercise ball towards them, knocking them down. Trent, dressed in a farmer's attire and  performed the cotton eye Joe. Halfway through his performance, cheerleaders, poms, and students from the bleachers joined. Lastly, Alec instructed the school with his origami skills on how to make a paper swan. After three of the steps, Alec pulled another previously finished swan out of his pants. The winner was determined by the loudness of applause and cheering bellowed from the bleachers. As Alec’s name was called, the stomping on the bleachers increased, and the cheering roared. Alec Ackerman received the final rose, the title of Mr. Chap, and the hearts of Chaparral.

By: Ashley Nesland

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Culture Day

Kids Participating in Culture Day Activities

Kids Participating in Culture Day Activities

Last Friday, Chaparral’s foreign language honor societies held Culture Day in the commons from 2:00-4:00 pm. Students had an opportunity to experience different cultures through students who enjoy learning and teaching about them. Avery Muniz, the president of Spanish Honors Society was one of the planners of the event. “It started as a simple suggestion by Lainey Crystal that the officers decided was a great idea, then it grew as we planned which aspects of culture to represent. After that we decided it would be even more awesome to include the other honor societies as well,” Muniz said.

The event was a huge success, with students from language classes visiting and learning many new things about culture. In addition to Spanish Honors Society, Chinese and French Honors Society were also involved. “Our goal is to represent not only Latin american cultures but other countries throughout the world like China and and France as well,” Muniz added. The event included food, art displays, interactive activities, and guest speakers. “I would like to generate respect and appreciation for other cultures around the world by exposing Chap students to aspects of culture they may not know about while also fostering appreciation for diversity. Hopefully, culture day will become an annual tradition for years to come,” Muniz said.

By: Chloe Heffernan

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Trumps First Few Weeks

Donald Trump, Mike Pence, and Paul Ryan Discussing Certain Affairs 

Donald Trump, Mike Pence, and Paul Ryan Discussing Certain Affairs 

Many recent events and executive orders by Donald Trump in first few weeks of his presidency, have made headlines around the world. But, many people do not know about everything Donald Trump has done, and the impact of his decisions. Most of his decisions have been executive orders. An executive order is a legally binding order given by the President who is the head of the executive branch. An executive order is usually given to direct federal agencies in how to execute laws. During Trump’s first weeks in presidency, he has made 8 big decisions, most of them executive orders.

1. Attempt to cut down regulations on Businesses

An executive order that requests when a new regulation is proposed two other regulations will have to be specified to be dropped. Immediate Impact: No immediate impact, but  will have to wait and see what new regulations are proposed and dropped.

2. Travel Ban

The suspension of refugees for 120 days, and a cap on the number of immigrants allowed in the country. The most controversial issues include an indefinite ban on Syrian refugees, and a ban on anyone arriving from seven Muslim-majority countries (Iraq, Iran, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, and Somalia, and Libya.) A cap of 50,000 refugees total. Immediate impact: All of these were enacted immediately. This means people were immediately stopped from boarding U.S. Flights from the 7 majority Muslim  countries. Also, people who were currently on flights were detained when they were landed. As of February 6th, Trump is now facing a number of lawsuits and a federal judge has blocked the ban from going into effect.

3. Border Security

First Order: Trump has declared that the US will create "a contiguous, physical wall or other similarly secure, contiguous, and impassable physical barrier.” Second Order: The second order pledges to hire 10,000 more immigration officers, and to revoke federal grant money from "sanctuary cities" which refuse to deport undocumented immigrants. Immediate Impact: Funding from sanctuary cities stopped, and the hiring of immigration officers. But, before the wall can be built Trumps administration will need to figure out how to raise the money needed.

4. Pipeline Construction Advanced

Trump has signed two orders to advance construction of two pipelines, the Keystone XL and Dakota Access Pipeline. Trump told reporters both deals would be renegotiated, and using American steel was a requirement. The Keystone Pipeline is a 1,179-mile pipeline running from Canada to US and was halted by President Barack Obama in 2015 due to concerns over the message it would send about climate change. The second pipeline was halted last year as the Army looked at other routes, and from huge protests by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe at a North Dakota site. Immediate Impact: No immediate impact because the advance on construction of the pipelines have to be reviewed by the Army Corps of Engineers, and approved by the State Department.

5. Managing Healthcare

One of his first actions as president was to manage healthcare and obamacare. An executive order by Trump states that agencies must "waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay any portions of the Affordable Care Act that creates financial burden on states, individuals or healthcare providers.” Immediate impact: No immediate impact, because the order must pass in the House of Representatives, pass in the Senate and then be signed into law to take effect.

6. Re-instituting a ban on international abortion counseling

An executive order by Trump reinstated this policy. The policy was originally called the Mexico City policy, and was first instituted by Ronald Reagan in 1984. It prevents any foreign and non government agency or organization to receive US money for providing aid with abortion and for “providing counseling or referrals for abortion or advocating for access to abortion services in their country”. Immediate impact: Because this was an executive order by Trump, the policy only needs to written by the Secretary of State and Health and then the policy will be in effect. After this, foreign organizations will not be able to help and provide services for abortion in the U.S.

7. Federal Hiring Freeze

On Trump's first day as POTUS, he sent a directive in an executive order to Federal agencies to halt new government hiring. The freeze will not affect military spending though. Immediate Impact: The hiring freeze went into effect immediately and is expected to last around 90 days. The freeze allows some exceptions of hiring in military, public, and safety.

8. Withdrawing the U.S. from the Trans-Pacific Partnership

Trump issued an executive order that withdrew the U.S. from the TPP. The Partnership was favored by Obama during his years as President. The U.S. was not in the TPP when Trump formally withdrew the U.S. Before the U.S. could be admitted, the trade deal would have had to be approved by Congress. Immediate effect: The U.S. is immediately withdrawn, and the TPPP may fail because of the U.S. pulling out.

By: Matthew McCarthey

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Registration

Registration for upcoming 2017 Freshman, Juniors, and Seniors

Registration for upcoming 2017 Freshman, Juniors, and Seniors

Both incoming freshman and current Chaparral students have been preparing for the next school year. On January 19th, Chaparral counselors met with current Freshman, Sophomores and Juniors and talked to them about the next school year and their class selection for the next year. They also refreshed students on college and high school graduation requirements, so students can prepare themselves for classes they will have to take to get to college. “I think the meetings with counselors helped me because I was able to learn about new classes I can take next year, and I was able to think about classes I want to take in later years.” Said current freshman Josh Linero. Counselors were also available during lunch that day and talked to students one on one. Incoming Freshmen received their course selection guide with the guide of classes for the 2017-2018 school year on January 19th. On January 25th Chaparral will host incoming freshman during the Chaparral Showcase and students will learn about what their freshman year will be like, meet teachers and learn more about classes available to them. All class selection forms are due on the 27th of January and students will choose their classes in school for online verification on the 29th. The online course selection on Infinite Campus will also close at 3 P.M. on the 29th. This is the last day  Chaparral Students will receive their 2017-2018 schedules on May 16th, and incoming Freshman will receive their schedules sometime in May.

By: Matthew McCarthy

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Big Families

Duggar family from the original TV show 19 Kids and Counting 

Duggar family from the original TV show 19 Kids and Counting 

The American Dream has typically involved families having 2 children, but as the ideals have changed on what is the American Dream, the ‘norm’ of having smaller families is vanishing and the amounts of siblings is growing.

 Junior Reilly McGovern’s family consists of 8 siblings altogether, which she shares is very chaotic sometimes, yet they all have learned how to live together. “Most are moved out, but when more of us were living there it was really bad because there were only 2 bathrooms we could use.” The boys lived in the basement, while the girls lived upstairs. All 8 siblings names are Reilly, Jesse, Jenna, Justin, Ian, Ryan, Alex, Katelyn, and Amanda. “Jesse is the only blood relative to me, the others are step siblings.” A few of the siblings already have kids of their own as well. Reilly is closest with her sister Jenna. “Jenna is the one I talk to the most. She lives in the basement since the boys don’t anymore so it’s a huge room and we just hang out there all the time, talk, play xbox, and watch YouTube.”

Reilly’s family compares to the famous TV family The Duggars (from 19 Kids and Counting) with the large amount of siblings. While being very different families, what is common is the family value and the traditions that make each family unique.

By: Ally Clinard and Megan Mondragon

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Dan Brite's Return

Photo Provided by Parker Adventist Hospital

Photo Provided by Parker Adventist Hospital

On December 22nd, Detective Dan Brite was released from Craig Hospital with his family. Dan was a deputy for the Douglas County Sheriff’s department, who was shot in the line of duty on September 2nd while responding to reports of a suicidal man near Sierra Middle School. He is currently paralyzed from the waist down, and is unable to walk. He originally stayed in a local hospital, and was then transferred to Craig Hospital. He was transferred because Craig hospital specialises in spinal cord injuries. A caravan of police vehicles and ambulances escorted Dan and his family to their home in Castle Rock while people lined the streets to congratulate Dan and watch him ride home. While Dan was in the hospital, the people of Douglas County rallied together. Many different fundraisers raised over 50,000 dollars for detective Brite and his family, including a GoFundMe page, a fundraiser ran by the Coffee Cabin, an auction put on by the Cherokee Ranch and Castle Foundation, and a fundraiser by the Fallen Officers Fund.

By: Matthew McCarthy

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State Qualifiers

Photos Taken By Mrs. Mossman

Photos Taken By Mrs. Mossman

The Chaparral DECA Chapter was named the District 11 Conference Champions last Tuesday. 72 students from District 11 schools including Ponderosa, Legend, and Douglas County qualified to continue on to state. The state conference will be held in Colorado Springs at the end of February. An additional 16 students received top test scores in their respective categories, and will also move on to state. A few of the Chaparral students who received top test scores include Riley Hyvonen, Dalton Mendoza, Zachary Munn and Cambria Peterson. All of the 72 students who qualified for state had to have both their test score, and their two role play scores add together and finish in the top 20 of their category.

By: Matthew McCarthey

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