Pride for the New Superintendent 

Pride for the New Superintendent 

Douglas County School District has had its run with superintendents. Since the former superintendent Lisa Fagen resigned, the board was left in search of a new start. Over the summer many applicants applied for the job, last month they came to a conclusion. A vote was held between the district, and Erin Kane had won 4:3. With this new addition to DCSD, comes new ideas, new ways to improve the school's. Erin Kane proves just this by already visiting the 86 schools she oversees, “The superintendent is the chief executive of the school district. Like any chief executive, as Interim Superintendent, I am ultimately responsible for all aspects of the organization including educational, operational, and financial success.  Douglas County School District has 67,000 students, 86 schools, 8,000 employees, and a $600+ million annual budget.  The superintendent oversees it all,” said Kane. A busy schedule is an understatement describing a superintendent's job. Although, Kane in her first week has already shown attentiveness to improve DCSD schools. Maintaining a positive outlook is a vision Kane sees for the schools and their futures. Kane stated “I want to focus on fostering a positive culture among staff students and parents and I want to work very hard to bring our school community together.  If we start with that premise that everyone wants what is best for our students, we will find common ground.  Once we find common ground, there is nothing we cannot achieve by working together.” Kane proves time and time again that she is qualified and passionate about children's education and the importance of it, but she still admires snow days as much as everyone else. Kane voiced her prospect on snow days  “As the leader of American Academy, I was a bit more lenient with snow days (I would occasionally call a snow day that DCSD did not call). However, snow days are very tricky. Student, parent, and staff safety are the primary consideration during the thought process. However, we also need to think about the loss of valuable instruction time and the thousands of families in DCSD with young children, where both parents have jobs that they have to go to.”  Kane provided many detailed plans, as to where she wants to provide her attention to, and she has already started doing so in her first week at Douglas County School District.

By: Hannah Lee

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