Photo taken from twitter account @ChapHappenings

Photo taken from twitter account @ChapHappenings

Monday, August 21, 2017 was an important day in the making-- the 2017 Solar Eclipse. This is the first coast to coast solar eclipse passing through the Continental United States since February 26, 1979. People traveled all over to get the best view for the eclipse in areas of complete totality. Places along the path of complete totality experienced the height of the eclipse where in the middle the day, the sky was dark. According to estimations there were as many as 7.4 million people who traveled through Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, Georgia, and South Carolina to watch the eclipse. Some Chaparral students traveled along the paths of totality for the eclipse, but others didn't have to go as far. Most of the students that were at school Monday went outside approximately at 11:47 to catch a glimpse of the spectacular phenomenon with their classes. "My favorite part was the peak because it was unique and it's cool how our solar system works with the timing of the line up," said junior Ashley Elgin. The excitement for the eclipse was well built up for the past 38 years. "It was significant because I've always loved nature and the sun and moon," said junior Ariana Schivinski. Everyone was advised not to look at the sun directly because even though there was an eclipse, the sun that was still visible could severely damage the human eyes. Chaparral students were sure to wear their special eclipse glasses when going to watch the eclipse.  β€œIt was a once in a lifetime experience,” said junior Nico Fuentealba. August 21, 2017 was a phenomenon that left the world anticipating the next solar eclipse in April of 2024.

Story by Erica Grotts

Comment