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It’s A Lacrosse Thing

The girls lacrosse team is a very unique group here at Chaparral. The team is combined with multiple schools, but that doesn’t stop it from feeling like a family. All the girls and coaches are there to get better at the sport they love and to make long lasting friendships. “I coach to help girls to become women of empathy and integrity, who will become responsible leaders that will impact changes in the world for good” says varsity head coach, Dix Baines. He has been a coach for girls lacrosse for 17 years. He says that he “especially appreciate the women’s game as it’s style of play is closer to the Native Americans original contests.” Even though the team is made up of multiple schools, there’s a special connection between the girls, “we are one team, given the opportunity to participate as a Co-Op” says Baines. Rather than being rivals, the girls become one unit that supports each other and gives each other strength to keep doing their best while playing. Lacrosse is a sport that is growing very fast “there are not enough trained officials and coaches to cover the demand” said Baines; that is one of the reasons that the schools combined their girls team. The popularity of the sport keeps it afloat “as many as half of the 50 + varsity teams playing are co-ops” said Baines. There are many different teams here at Chap, however the girls lacrosse team has a different experience while playing their sport, which creates an unparalleled experience for all the individuals involved.

By: Lauren Browne

Photo by Lauren Browne

Photo by Lauren Browne

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Remaining Undefeated

The Chaparral Girls Varsity Soccer team continued to embark on their impressive and undefeated season as they traveled to Dicks Sporting Goods Park to compete against their crosstown rivals- the Legend Titans- on Wednesday evening. Chaparral also celebrated their four beloved graduating seniors, Malak Rafik, Sydney Mullen, Ava Wilson, and Tori Bernabei for their annual Senior Night.

A solid performance throughout the game proved the depth and talent that the squad possess this year. But, one player seemed to stand out during the match, the stunning offensive production of sophomore midfielder Aubree Martinez sat well above all else as she racked up a goal and three assists to lead the team to an overall victory of 4-1. Seeming as if she was the oil that made everything run, Martinez created dangerous plays and opportunities within minutes of her entering the game. Martinez has been a member of the varsity squad since her freshman year and is in communication with several D1 programs.

The team continues on with an undefeated season and remains possibly the best one in the books. With several more matches ahead, the team plans to build on this fundamental success on their challenging road to playoffs.

By Avree Martinez

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The Road Ends Here

Monday, April 3 marked the end of the month long journey. A packed audience of 63,400 filled the University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona, and millions more tuned in on CBS to see the Gonzaga Bulldogs face the North Carolina Tar Heels. It was an intense battle to the end, but North Carolina ended on top in a 71-65 victory. Every school goes into the tournament with the expectation to be classified as a winner. Here are the makings of a champion, the qualities that shape a team’s success, as seen through the Tar Heels basketball program:

 

 

1. A DRIVEN COACH

Roy Williams is a former UNC alum, playing in the late 60s, an assistant coach in the 70s and 80s, and since 2003, the head coach. He may know more about his school than any coach in the history of college basketball, with the exception to his mentor and former Tar Heels coach Dean Smith. The Final Four is not foreign to him; he’s walked in those halls ten times. Only three people have held the championship trophy more times than Williams’s three: Adolph Rupp (Four time champion, has coached many legends of the game), Mike Krzyzewski (Five time champion, one of the primary reasons why Duke is a national powerhouse), and John Wooden (Ten time champion, arguably the greatest basketball coach ever). The head coach is meant to build a team’s culture, and without the direction of Roy Williams, North Carolina could have lost their winning ways.

 

2. HEALING THROUGH TIME

Experience is what allows humans to develop their talents and overcome mistakes. In the current one-and-done world where most college basketball players want to leave college as soon as possible to the pros, North Carolina’s maturity and continuity was admirable. The upperclassmen players outnumbered the underclassmen 9-6, which is a large margin for a powerhouse team like the Tar Heels. For the older athletes, they all had one experience that haunted yet motivated them all season: the shocking loss at the buzzer in the 2016 national championship against Villanova. The pain of the loss further built the comradery, and because of the upset, star upperclassmen Justin Jackson, Joel Berry II, Kennedy Meeks, and Isaiah Hicks all stayed, despite the possibility of each of them being selected in the NBA draft. The blood, sweat, and tears these guys suffered together only made the 2017 win that much more special.

3. SHARING THE LOVE

Though Jackson, Berry, Meeks, and Hicks have made a name for themselves, the depth of the Tar Heels cannot be underestimated. Sophomore Luke Maye, who only averages 14 minutes per game, exploded for 17 points against Kentucky in the Elite Eight, including the game winning shot that solidified his clutch ability. Junior Theo Pinson has been constantly overlooked because his numbers don’t jump out at you, but many of the players and coaches would agree that without him, their run wouldn’t be possible. Freshman Seventh Woods was a high school sensation in South Carolina, but sacrificed playing time for the betterment of the team. Senior Stilman White never averaged more than 5 minutes per game in his 4 years at UNC, but never complained and contributed well when his name was called. The roster seemingly had no ego, which helped skyrocket their title chances.

 

4. BACK TO WORK

The day after Dean Smith’s UNC team winning the 1993 national championship against Michigan, he wasn’t celebrating. Instead, he was taking flights to various cities in attempts to scout new players that would later join the team. This week, Roy Williams is expected to take trips to try to recruit two of the top high school seniors in the nation: shooting guard Romeo Langford from New Albany, Indiana, and power forward Zion Williamson from Spartanburg, South Carolina. This has become the Tar Heel tradition: celebrate the moments of success, but always strive to get better. Meanwhile, Pinson, Berry, and Jackson have an important decision: whether to stay for their senior years or commit one year early to the NBA. Seniors Meeks and Hicks will graduate and most likely try to go pro themselves. For the three other senior players that were less utilized, it will be an uphill battle in trying to become a professional player, but they’ve been in this situation before. Proving those around them wrong is something they’ve been accustomed to, and many past Tar Heels have exceeded expectations.


    So, the road is over. Success, upset, heartbreak, and greatness has defined the Madness in 2017, but don’t think that the universities are taking time to rest. It’s the habits made in the offseason that translate into on-the-court dominance. After all, the behind-the-scenes diligence becomes what are the makings of a champion.

By Carson Frost

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And Then There Were Four

Thirteen days ago, 68 teams began fighting for a dream: to power through 6 rounds of single-elimination competition and bring back a national championship to their campus. Since then, some groups have exceeded the world’s expectations through the method of survive and advance. Others seemed destined to dominate the early rounds, but were shocked by an unexpected winner, also referred to as a Cinderella team. Now, 4 teams remain, a mere half of a percent of the original 68.

In my original Selection Sunday column, I created a list of 4 teams that had the potential to go all the way. From my choices, only North Carolina remains, not surprising as they have experience. The Tar Heels nearly pulled out the national championship victory in 2016, but Villanova’s insane buzzer-beating win cut them short. Junior Justin Jackson has been unstoppable, a versatile big that can shoot from the outside and leads by example.

They will prepare to face the Oregon Ducks: a team that made it to the Elite 8 last year, but expected a deeper run. Junior Dillon Brooks has been clutch all year round, and not even some of the best teams in the nation have had an answer to his larger than life scoring abilities.

Only 2 of the 4 finalists are number one seeds: North Carolina and Gonzaga. Despite the Gonzaga Bulldogs holding the one seed, many experts anticipated an earlier exit from the tournament. Nonetheless, they’re here, and they won’t want to take their first ever Final Four appearance for granted. Junior Nigel Williams-Goss has been a National Player of the Year candidate all season, so the star power is there for the Bulldogs.

Facing Gonzaga will be the South Carolina Gamecocks, a seventh seed Cinderella team that has shocked the country every step of the way. Senior Sindarius Thornwell has made his case for the tournament’s Most Outstanding Player award, and should become an NBA player next year too.

The two matchups will tip on Saturday, April 1, beginning with South Carolina/Gonzaga at 4:09 PM. A case can be made for each team to win it all, and here is what could put them over the top:

 

 

SOUTH CAROLINA

The Gamecocks are obviously the huge underdogs, but the case that can be made for them is that they’ve been underestimated all tournament. Many people wondered at the beginning if they were good enough to even be one of the 68 teams, but here they are: two games away from winning it all. They also happen to be on fire right now, coming off a 88-81 upset against Duke in the second round, then a 70-50 mauling against Baylor in the Sweet Sixteen, and finally their late game heroics in the Elite Eight to stun Florida 77-70. Coach Frank Martin has instilled confidence in his group, and there’s no reason they couldn’t shock the world again.

 

GONZAGA

With the Bulldogs, there’s one thing for sure: they know how to win. Their 36-1 record on the season is the best in college basketball, yet experts are skeptical because their schedule hasn’t been as tough as some other major schools. What can’t be disputed is that they’re still competing, and have talented players capable of going all the way. Not only has Williams-Goss impressed NBA scouts, but Polish center Przemek Karnowski intrigues many teams. He’s a very efficient scorer and uses his 7’1” and 288 pound frame to his advantage. Gonzaga has had to prove the doubters wrong every step of the way, so why not now?

 

OREGON

Not only has Brooks taken over in March, but sophomore Tyler Dorsey has been dominant, coming off a 27 point game in the surprising win against number one seeded Kansas. The Ducks have made deep runs in the tourney before, have high IQ basketball talent, and have dodged every obstacle placed in front of them. When they start feeling themselves, they become as dangerous as any other power in the nation.

 

NORTH CAROLINA

The definite consensus is that the Tar Heels are the favorite. They have the most experience, most talent, and most NBA scouts watching them. They come into the Final Four just after sophomore Luke Maye scored an insane game-winner against elite Kentucky. This is also just one year following their run to the national championship game against Villanova. Their confidence must be at an all time high, so as long as they stay hungry and focused, they should be able to finish it off in a season for the history books


The tournament like no other in all of sports is nearly finished. The players are ready, the coaches are ready, the fans are ready. March madness is about pride and legacy, and those who make an impact become timeless heroes in the college basketball world.

By Carson Frost 

 


 

Source: CBS Sports

Source: CBS Sports

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Track Stars

Track and field is a sport that includes competitions in the skills of running, jumping, and throwing. Chaparral’s track and field team has been training hard to represent Chaparral for this new season. The athletes head down to the school's track and field to train and practice everyday for a two hours for a meet.

Four years letter winner and leader, Tad Trimarco has been part of the team through his High School career. Consistently training and keeping in shape, Tad has set great examples for all of the underclassmen that are apart of the track and field team. “If I could give any advice it would be trust the process, come to practice everyday and be ready to work hard. Continue to do solid work for the four years and stay motivated and passionate,” said Trimarco. Trimarco’s goals for the season are to try and get a school record in 800m, qualify to walk-on at CSU, place at state, and go to sub-50, meaning to run a 10k in 50 minutes in a 4x400m.

The track and field team have many talented, hard working, underclassmen athletes, like sophomore Josh Walo. Walo runs the mile and two mile events. “My favorite part is seeing the hard work I put in, pay off in the end,” said Walo. Walo’s goals for the season are to qualify for state and win the mile event or the two mile event and come home with breaking school records.

The best opportunity the athletes get to make breaking records are at the smaller competitions. One of the biggest track and field meets is against rival school Legend High School and will be taking place April 8th at Echo Park stadium. Make sure to head out and support the track athletes this season.

By Naomi Martin

Photo by Naomi Martin 

Photo by Naomi Martin 

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Coors Field Game

Every year the Chaparral Baseball Team gets a chance to show their skills at Coors Field.  This year on March 16, the team took a day trip to the field to play Arapahoe High School and also got to explore the stadium in the meantime. Senior Andrew Psaltis said that “we get to the field, go in the players entrance, then get to change into uniforms in the clubhouse (locker rooms) before the game. The day consists of warming up at Chap’s field to play the game and then going to the stadium.”

The Wolverines started off the game strong with a triple from senior Alec Ackerman. As the game continued, Chaparral had a lead of 3-1 against Arapahoe. Sophomore Bryce Matthews hit a ball past the center fielder for another triple. Shortly after, Arapahoe battled back to score 3 runs in the 6th inning. The game was finished with a lost to the Warriors 4-3.

Even though it was a tough lost, playing at Coors Field is a once in a lifetime chance. Psaltis commented that “my favorite part is getting the chance to stand in the same batter’s box as some of the best players in the world.” The team is preparing to train hard and show what they got as they head down to Arizona for Spring Break.

By Amanda Lehman

Photo by Mckenna Webb

Photo by Mckenna Webb

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Selection Sunday

It’s a tournament like no other: 68 teams, single elimination, and one goal: to win the National Championship. With the numerous games comes the classic storybook narratives: the prodigious powerhouses, the unsuspecting Cinderellas, and the mid-major miracles. The teams are diverse, and one of the most special parts of the tournament is the melting pot of personalities that make the different universities unique.

On Sunday, March 12, the 68 contenders were announced on CBS’s Selection Sunday. Teams that won their conference tournament were granted an automatic bid, while the remaining spots were given to teams that didn’t win their conference, but have proven their legitimacy enough for the selection committee to qualify them. Now that the bracket is official (see graphic below), the games begin with the First Four taking place on Tuesday, March 14 and Wednesday, March 15.

    First, the favorites. The following teams are those you may want to consider to go all the way on your bracket. Of course, there’s no guarantees in the single elimination tournament, but these groups are poised and focused to go all the way:

 

DUKE

When it comes to March Madness, Duke is no stranger to the bright lights. Head coach Mike Krzyzewski has won the National Championship 5 times in his coaching career, and the Blue Devils been preparing for March all year. Led by sophomore sensation Luke Kennard and freshman prodigy Jayson Tatum, the road to the tourney hasn’t been smooth, but they’re here and determined to win.

NORTH CAROLINA

Last season, the Tar Heels lost in possibly the most upsetting fashion ever: a game-winning three from Villanova’s Chris Jenkins as time ran out. Being the runner-up in last year’s tournament, they obviously have the experience. It also helps that their team is led by juniors Justin Jackson and Joel Barry, along with seniors Kennedy Meeks and Isaiah Hicks. This is a team that knows how to win, and has been there before.

KENTUCKY

Head coach John Calipari has demanded success since joining the team in 2009, and the Wildcats haven’t disappointed. Calipari’s teams have been in 4 of the last 8 Final Fours, one of them ending in a national championship in 2012. The Wildcats are young, as the two leading scorers are freshmen Malik Monk and De’Aaron Fox, but Calipari has built a culture there that leads many to believe they are as capable of winning as anybody else.

VILLANOVA

You can’t count out the defending champs, and Jay Wright’s Villanova Wildcats have been ranked number 1 in the country for the better part of the year. Senior Josh Hart, sophomore Jalen Brunson, and senior Kris Jenkins already have 1 championship under their belt, and despite the great difficulty in repeating as national champions, Villanova might just prove that it can be done.

    As you fill out your bracket, remember that choosing the correct national champion is valued just as much as correctly selecting each of the 32 first round winners. March madness is now in full swing, so brace yourself for a legendary ride to the top of the college basketball world.

 

By Carson Frost 

 

Graphic Provided by SBNATION

Graphic Provided by SBNATION

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CHSAA Approved

The thrill of hockey is exhilarating. The chill of the ice, the competition that crashes into the boards. Chaparral High School Ice Hockey has been a club of Chaparral, but was never recognized as an official CHSAA sport. With the help of Social Studies teacher and future hockey coach, Ryan Finnefrock this change has been made. Next season, the Chaparral Club Hockey Team  will combine with Ponderosa and Legend, creating a single, unified Parker team.

    

The process of becoming a recognized sport has been a long time coming for Coach Finnefrock. A former player player for the Chaparral Club Team, including the 2010 State Championship Team, Finnefrock was waiting for his chance to take the next step for Chaparral. By presenting his idea to CHSAA on March 3rd, Coach Finnefrock officially took that next step and succeeded. CHSAA granted Coach Finnefrock an official sports team, encompassing all three Parker high schools. This new unified team will not only be the third DCSD hockey team recognized by CHSAA, but will also be a new addition to the Pinnacle Conference.


Similarly, the transition of becoming a CHSAA recognized team, will carry impacts not only to the local schools, but the also the community as well.  Being a combined team that encompasses all three of the high schools, the hockey team will help to unite the entire Parker community. Chaparral Athletic Director Robert Johnson states that “Especially within the hockey community. They go to battle everyday together… but in moments like this,  [Parker] still a big family.” The process of becoming a CHSAA recognized team has worked two-fold; first it has given the Parker high schools a team to prove themselves against the best CHSAA schools, but has also given Parker a single team to cheer under. There are no more worries of three different schools to cheer for here in the hockey world. Only a single unified Parker team.

By Regan Smith

Graphic by Reagan Smith 

Graphic by Reagan Smith 

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The Basketball Playoffs Journal: A New Era (3/1)

They call it the Sweet Sixteen. Sixteen teams remain, all in quest for the prized state championship. When the ball is thrown in the air at tip-off, it’s winning time. All previous rankings, battles, highs, and lows are out the window, and only one team can continue on. The Wolverines are young, but hungry, and have worked from the lowest of fan expectations to win widespread respect. And as head coach Tellus Truesdale said unhesitantly: “We aren’t afraid of anybody.”

Standing on the other side of the court on the neutral Manual High School floor is the George Washington Patriots, and the athletes are freakish. The high-jumping, fast-speed, and built group is led by senior Jervay Green, the same player who scored 64 points by himself 3 weeks ago. The team is ranked 4th in the state, but Truesdale thinks even higher of them. “In my eyes, they’re the best team in the state,” said Truesdale. “They’re fast, athletic, and are the best scoring team in Colorado.”

 

GAME DAY:

Don’t think that the 92-61 George Washington win over Chap in the regular season or the high reputation of the Patriots’ program discourages the Wolverines. “We’ve played the best teams in the state and are a confident group,” said Truesdale. “The pressure is more on them than it is on us.”

The stands are filling up as the teams warm up at Manual High School. As the Chaparral players look around, they see family. Girls varsity head coach Tony Speights looks on from the opposite baseline. The cheerleaders and sea of red hype themselves up. Former NBA star Jason Richardson walks in, attracting many stunned looks from the crowd. The George Washington kids come from a more urban, diverse background on the east side of downtown Denver, while the Chap students hail from the growing suburb of Parker. Crazy how a wooden floor, orange ball, and tall basket can bring people together.

Finally, after all the anxiousness building up from both sides, the game tips with the Wolverines gaining possession and sophomore Ronnie Degray quickly scoring the first bucket on an easy layup. Degray is a literal sophomore, but a figurative senior. On a team full of young guys, he is the leader, and has a maturity that transcends his youth.

Degray scores the first 8 points of the game, and the circumstances seem great early for the underdog Wolverines. But from that point on, the Patriots took over.

The quickness, the agility, the explosiveness, the tenacity. Chaparral didn’t have the ability to put out the fire created by the George Washington stars. Degray contributed all that he could, netting 24 points, 6 rebounds, and 2 steals. The 14th best scoring team in the US in George Washington rolled to a 83-57 win, and what seemed momentous was the pain of defeat felt contagiously in the entire building from the Chap fans.

 

A NEW ERA:

What comes instantly following a long season is the coaches evaluating their players, the fans evaluating their team, and the players evaluating themselves. From the beginning, Truesdale knew of his team’s capabilities, but what matters is what’s executed on the floor. “We have a group of guys who are responsible and play for the team,” said Truesdale. “We might be young, but our guys play like seniors.” Looking back on an accomplished season, here are the top five games of the year in Chaparral basketball:

 

  • December 8, 2016: Grand Junction vs Chaparral: Chap wins 74-45

Ronnie Degray drops 24 points and 7 rebounds, Joseph Dalton adds 17 points and 4 rebounds, and Bryce Matthews tallies 8 points and 10 rebounds. The three starting sophomores showcased their maturity and skill despite their young age, and the Wolverines decisively move on to the semifinals of the Chaparral/ThunderRidge Tipoff Tournament.

 

  • December 16, 2016: Agassi Prep vs Chaparral: Chap wins 83-48

This was the largest margin of victory for Chap on the season, and playing under the bright lights in Las Vegas, the team was able to celebrate a little extra that day. Every player that dressed scored at least 2 points, with junior Wayne Fish and Matthews leading the way scoring 14 a piece.

 

  • December 20, 2016: Chaparral vs Coral Academy: Chap wins 79-62

Another game in Vegas, another game where Matthews went off. This time, he finished with 27 points and 20 rebounds, both career bests by far. The 20 rebounds is a number that has never been done by a Chap sophomore, and anyone in attendance witnessed a piece of Wolverine basketball history.

 

February 10, 2017: Chaparral vs Legend: Chap wins 50-45

Degray’s 15 points and freshman Kobe Sanders’s 8 points, 4 rebounds, and 6 assists fueled yet another victory for Chaparral over Legend. Since head coach Tellus Truesdale took over two years ago, the Wolverines have always beaten the Titans.

 

  • February 15, 2017: Regis Jesuit vs Chaparral: Chap wins 53-50

Overcoming a 12 point lead late in the third quarter, the Wolverines showcased an unbelievable finish in the second round playoff game. Dalton took over with 19 points and 5 rebounds, and Degray had 14 points, 6 rebounds, and 2 blocks.

By Carson Frost

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The Basketball Playoffs Journal: Week 1 (2/25)

    The Colorado State High School Basketball Tournament is where history is made and players can engrave their names into the record books forever. At Chaparral, winning is a tradition, and every moment in the regular season leads up to competing to become the best team in the state. Who could forget the time five years ago when Cory Calvert led his team to overtime against Arapahoe, took it up the court for Chap, and missed the game-winning three, allowing Josh Adams to soar above the defenders for the putback layup at the buzzer? Today, every member of that 2012 team is labeled a champion, something that cannot be taken away for as long as they live.

In this single elimination bracket, importance comes with surviving and advancing. One little mishap and the season can fade. Today, the journey begins. In Chap’s home gym, they face the Regis Jesuit Raiders. The Wolverines were granted a first round bye, and Regis dominated Arvada West 73-51 in the first round, meaning 32 teams remain fighting to be the best in Colorado. Going into the game, the competition seems intriguing.

 

 

PREVIOUS ENCOUNTERS:

On February 15, Chap and Regis played in Aurora, giving both sides an early preview of their later determined second round matchup. A few notes on the game:

  • Despite the intense visiting crowd, Chaparral dominated in a 65-47 win

  • The Wolverines outshot the Raiders 46% to 39% from the field

  • Chap won the rebounding battle 28-17

 

 

 

    

GAME DAY:

    As the lineups for the teams are announced, the intense screams echo in the Wolverine’s gym. Junior and critical role-player Wayne Fish is missing his first game of the season, and his absence could prove to be fatal. Another factor swinging more towards the Raiders’ favor is the smaller but just as loud opposing student section. The ref blows his whistle, throws the ball in the air and we’re off.

    Star sophomore Ronnie Degray sinks an early corner three to start the game for Chaparral, but the talented Regis sophomore Jamil Safieddine fires back from deep immediately to tie it 3-3. Before the game, Chap was the clear favorite as they had a better ranking in the state, but Regis surprises many with their patience and frequent ball movement. After the first quarter, the Raiders lead 13-9. The opposing crowd is ecstatic, and the home team’s sea of white sounds slightly deflated, but not entirely discouraged.

    In the second, the Wolverines turns the aggression up to match the toughness of the hard-nosed, energetic Regis team. Their offensive execution improves, led by the smooth shooting from sophomore Joseph Dalton. Despite the improving offense, Chap’s defense isn’t perfect, and Safieddine kept making three-pointer after three-pointer. At the half, Chaparral still trailed Regis 26-22.

To begin the third quarter, the game’s tempo peaks, and the Raiders’ size and strength allows them to pull away. Regis junior Elijah Martinez is shooting threes efficiently, and the monster 6’11” sophomore Samba Kane constantly forces his way inside, including a powerful slam-dunk to give the Raiders a 41-32 lead.

Chap trailed by as many as 12 in the fourth, but head coach at Tellus Truesdale makes a point to his guys to push to the ball and cut down on the excessive turnovers. When your back is against the wall, and your team needs you to take over, it measures your character and will to win. Dalton understands this and he energizes the comeback with a step back three, then some great defense, then makes two free throws. The 12 point deficit becomes 5: 49-44 with 2:30 to go. Then, sophomore Jovon Nelson takes it to the rim to make it three. On both sides of the ball, the Wolverines were executing.

Degray is fouled with 41.5 seconds to go. The score is 50-47 Regis, meaning Chap has two free throws for a chance to cut the lead to one point. Unfortunately, the team has struggled all day at the free throw line, and the electric opposing crowd wouldn’t give Degray complete focus. The first one is up and in. Tie game. Now the Raiders crowd is elevating the decibel level to an even higher point. A couple of dribbles from Degray, a momentary stare at the net, a slight bend of the knees, and the release of the ball. Nothing but net.

On the other end, Chap fouls Safieddine who is given a one-and-one at the free throw line. If he misses the first, the ball is live and can be taken back from Chap. If he scores, the ball is dead and Safieddine is granted a second shot. Something isn’t right as the Raiders sophomore looks tense. He misses the shot, and Chap rebounds. A quick bucket is returned once again by Degray, and the Wolverines did the impossible: they have the 51-50 lead with 15 seconds to go.

Now Martinez is fouled, but somehow he misses the shot as well. Dalton eventually goes to the free throw line and makes two. From then, the defense and smart play gives Chaparral a remarkable comeback win. The final score was 53-50.

Martinez’s 16 points and Safieddine’s 13 points fueled the strong Regis performance, but it was the 19 points and 5 rebounds from Dalton that powered the Wolverines late-game surge. Degray also contributed 14 points, 6 rebounds, and 2 blocks.

Up next, Chaparral will have to play with heart as they will travel to downtown Denver to face the elite George Washington Patriots. The game will be tough, but it is the teamwork and effort that won them this round two game that will be needed in the Sweet Sixteen.

By Carson Frost

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The Lane to State

Chaparral’s girls swim team puts a lot of heart and dedication into the season. The two hour practices every day after school pushing their bodies and minds to the max. All of it has lead to this moment: state. The girls trained for “eight weeks and then two weeks before state we began to taper which is where we give our muscles time to relax so we aren’t sore before the meet,” said Heidi Waldmann, a senior on the team. Swimming is much more than training the body to stay in shape, the swimmers have to have a strong mental toughness. “The hardest thing I had to overcome was my own thoughts,” said Julia Scadden, a junior on the team. She went on to say, “I knew I was in shape for the season. I knew I had a good suit, and I knew I was ready, but I had to keep reminding myself and my teammates how truly prepared we all were.” This year the team had to work a little harder in order to succeed this season. “The hardest thing I had to overcome this year was probably that we got a whole new coaching staff” said Waldmann. Even though the team had a new staff they came together and supported each other through everything. When Waldmann qualified for state she said, “I got out of the pool, my teammates all came over and gave me the biggest hug. It made me really happy getting out of the pool and knowing that all my hard work had paid off.” Making state was also a huge achievement for Scadden because of all the hard work she has put into swimming. Not just the work she did during this season, but also the seasons before. “Making state felt really good because I had gone my freshman and sophomore year as well,” said Scadden. Now she knows that putting in the work now will set her up for success in the future. Being able to compete in state is a big honor, but the best thing about state is “watching everyone, even people on my team, achieve their goals” Scadden said. Clearly, the Chaparral’s swim team went head on into state with no doubt that they would do their very best.

By Lauren Browne 

Photo by Lauren Browne 

Photo by Lauren Browne 

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Legend vs. Chaparral

As early as middle school, future wolverines know of their soon-to-be rivals, Legend High School. The rivalry between Chaparral and Legend reached an apex on Friday, February 10th at the annual basketball game.

The Chaparral Varsity Boys basketball team didn't blow away their sworn “frenemies,” but they did end up on top. Freshman Kobe Sanders said, “just keep playing and believing” when the game got tough. Chaparral and Legend fought hard for the win, the lead bouncing back and forth between the two schools. After the second half Chaparral was playing noticeably harder than before. Whatever Coach Truesdale said to the team during halftime really motivated the boys. “During the game I felt excited but I was locked in on beating Legend,” said sophomore and team captain, Ronnie DeGray. While the game progressed there were wild chants and supportive cheers from both the student and parent section for each school. There were some tough plays that made the game even more nerve-racking. The fact that this was a rivalry game made it all the more important to each school. Coming out on top with a win for Chaparral was a great triumph.

Ending the long and nerve racking game with a Chaparral win 50-45, half of the gym roared with excitement and the other half remained quiet and disappointed. The attitudes of the game shifted throughout each quarter but for the community and Town of Parker, the game was a great way to get the two schools together.

By Erica Grotts 

by Erica Grotts

by Erica Grotts

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Tad Trimarco Takes First

Track season is getting close as athletes prepare to set new goals and break new limits. Senior athlete Tad Trimarco competed in a pre season competition this past Sunday.  His events included the 1600m and 800m run, "[These events] are an interesting part of track because it's middle distance so you need to do long runs, intervals, weight-room sessions, and cross training," said Trimarco.
   His Hard work payed off as Trimarco achieved the title of USATF indoor state champion for 800m. "It was a great way to start the season and it puts me in a position to be ranked and qualify. It was a good race and shows good signs for later in the season," said Trimarco
  The next season is only weeks away and Tad Trimarco will be competing in his last track meets this coming spring. Trimarco has set many goals for his last upcoming season; "State is in May, I want to be in top 9 by then. So I will continue to train as hard as I can and I look forward to the growth," said Trimarco.
   The track athletes and fans are looking forward to another anticipated season beginning in early March.

By Olivia Goodman 

Provided by Tad Trimarco

Provided by Tad Trimarco

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California Invitational

Chaparral Boys Varsity Wrestling took on some tough challenges while preparing for their tournament Dinuba Invitational in California. The team was there for 4 days and two of those days were full of 12 hours of wrestling. Sophomore Chase Daly said, "It was very fun but really intense." Preparing for the tournament took a lot of time and effort from the team. "In preparation for California, I went to practice with the mindset of doing everything like there was someone else in California working 10 times harder than me," said sophomore Trey Johnson. Junior Jackson Daly’s mental motivation comes from listening to his teammates and making sure the team did what they could to make the tournament their best one yet. Senior Ty Johnson got 4th place out of 42 other kids in the tournament. He won 5 out of his 7 matches and his brother Trey won 2 out of his 4. The boys worked hard to make it to California and worked even harder while there. After all the hard work and finishing the tournament, the team had a day at Magic Mountain enjoying the amusement park. Staying busy and having fun with wrestling and rides was easy for them. The tournament in California was just one more accomplishment for the team. Varsity wrestling has started the season off strong and are looking forward to more incredible matches.

By Erica Grotts

Photo by  Erica Grotts

Photo by  Erica Grotts

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Josh Adams: Where is He Now?

At Chaparral, our athletes are celebrated, especially those who take their high school achievement to a higher level. Very few talented players make the cut of the Varsity team rosters, even less can compete at the collegiate level, and the amount of professional athletes from Chap can be counted on two hands. Josh Adams is one of those players that has been able to live through moments many sports fans dream of. Numerous fans that saw him play in high school can’t equate his dominance to any other prep athlete. A game-winning tip for a state championship, an All-American honorable mention in college, and an emerging professional career in Russia, his talent has taken him places far beyond his hometown of Parker. Rob Johnson, his coach and longtime friend, still doesn’t believe what the former student has accomplished and where he may be in the future years.

 

 

Carson Frost: When and where did you meet Josh Adams? What was your first impression of him?

 

Rob Johnson: I was coaching the JV team when his brother Jordan was a freshman. Josh must’ve been a fifth-grader. He was quiet, but had a great family. I really got to know him his eighth grade year. He was playing Gold Crown (team that prepares athletes for high school ball), and I just remember he was very ferocious. Even in eighth grade, he had an edge to him.

 

CF: As he progressed, did Josh surprise you with his ability, or was his potential always there?

 

RJ: We always knew he had a high ceiling because he was so athletic. By the end of his sophomore year, he was taking off athletically. He kept doing things that made you say “Oh my gosh.” In his junior and senior years, he did some things that I have never seen before. His game wasn’t always polished, but I knew he could be a Division I player.

 

CF: Is he the greatest athlete you’ve seen at the high school level?

RJ: (brief pause) Yeah. I can’t think of one more athletic. One time, we were playing Lewis Palmer in our small gym, who had Josh Scott, who’s like 6’10”. (Scott) ended up playing at CU and the NBA Summer League and was a strong, athletic bigman. (Adams) took it down the middle and dunked it right on Josh Scott. It happened so fast, (Scott) didn’t even know what happened. He may be only 6’2”, but he just goes so fast and with an incredible intensity.

 

CF: Cory Calvert was another dominant player. Did he and Adams ever clash? How did you balance both of their skillsets so that they could both get touches?

 

RJ: The reason it worked was because they were different players. Cory is more of a playmaker, good ball-handler, good court vision, and a great passer. Josh was making the big plays and could take over when he needed to. Luckily, they’re both humble guys. Josh may have preferred to have the ball in his hands more, but Cory was just so skilled. It may have drove Josh crazy, but it’s tough as coach.

 

CF: The defining moment in Adam’s career may be the putback layup at the buzzer to win the state championship. What did that play tell you about who Josh is as a player?

 

RJ: That play summed up everything Josh is about as a person. He just wants to win. You could even go back to the first playoff game that year against Dakota Ridge. We were down by ten points with two and a half minutes to go in the game, called a timeout, and Josh just took over the huddle. He told everybody that this wasn’t how he wanted to end the season and gave everything he had to help us comeback. That play in the state title showed his determination and attitude. (Calvert) missed the shot, but he was fine with that because Josh was there to pick it up.

 

CF: This past summer, Josh played in the NBA Summer League for the Denver Nuggets. He seemed to play very well, given the amount of opportunities the team game him. Do you feel that he will play in the NBA one day?

 

RJ: Absolutely. He has the athletic ability to do it, and he has that mental strength to go with it. His will, his determination, and his killer mentality will get him there.

 

The Orlando Magic and Philadelphia 76ers were among the NBA teams that expressed their interest in Adams. While he didn’t receive a contract for these clubs this summer, an opportunity awaits in Russia, where he will begin his first professional season. Josh Adams has always been underestimated, but when a fatal car accident in August led doctors to believe his athleticism may never be the same, he once again proved the doubters wrong. Not only did he return six months ahead of schedule on January 14, but he was named MVP of the game by the Russian media. Moving forward, the NBA is still on his radar, and as proven throughout the duration of his career, someone is always watching.

By Carson Frost

Photo by Sydney Mullen

Photo by Sydney Mullen

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A Legacy Left

On the night of January 6th, fans crowded the stands of Chaparral’s gymnasium not only to cheer on the Boys’ Basketball team as they took on the East High School Angels, but to join in the commemoration of the 2012 State Champion Basketball Team. Team members and coaches, as well as their families, came together to relive old memories and celebrate the fifth anniversary of their impressive state championship season. Thanks to Kevin Keyser, everyone was able to enjoy a video compilation including season highlights, as well as the team’s exhilarating championship run. The video included the intense final minutes of the State Championship game, where both Cory Calvert and Josh Adams came up with major plays that won the game for the Wolverines. Former Coach and current Athletic Director, Rob Johnson, then proceeded to introduce each player- touching on each of their accomplishments both at Chaparral and after graduation. Johnson beamed as he spoke of the team’s qualities--their will to win and their determination. Key player Josh Adams explained that “it incredible to see all the guys” and went on to describe how it felt like they hadn’t missed a beat. The guys remembered the bonds they made at Chaparral as they laughed and enjoyed themselves, reflecting on the memories they made as high school athletes. To close off the ceremony, Mr. Johnson presented Calvert and Adams with their honorary jerseys that will be hung up in Chaparral for years to come.

 

Looking back, there’s no denying that the talent of this basketball team was plentiful. The team went 25-3 overall, and 10-1 in league. Six roster members moved on to play collegiately, three of them attending division 1 schools. Adams, who scored 503 points his senior year, played another four years at the University of Wyoming, and four very notable years at that. He is now a promising prospect for the professional level. Calvert scored 513 points total as a senior before moving on to play at Brigham Young University. He is currently continuing his basketball career at Utah Valley University. Brandon Malone, who started as a sophomore, is currently playing for the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs along with Chris Moody, who was a freshman at the time of the championship. Jake Holtzmann, who was also freshman the year the team came to glory, went on to play three more stand-out seasons as a Wolverine before continuing at the University of Denver.

 

by Sydney Mullen
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Photos by Sydney Mullen

Photos by Sydney Mullen

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Down To Throwdown

The Crosstown Throwdown,’ Legend vs Chaparral. Almost every time Legend comes to Chaparral, the fans are intense and the players are putting everything on the line to own the town. It is an opportunity to add entertainment to the school rivalry: “The whole idea started with some coaches between Legend and us trying to start the year off with some good excitement and get the season kicked off with a lot of energy in the building and with the students,” said Rob Johnson, Chaparral’s athletic director. The showdown includes a showcase of talent from student-athletes and staff members, and their very own unified teams as well. Not only does it highlight the ability of the teams, it gives them the chance to show off what they're bringing to the upcoming season. This year’s Crosstown did just that.

The Throwdown started off with the Unified Basketball game. Although Legend took the ‘W,’ or win, for that game, both teams did amazingly well. They showed up and inspired the crowd by playing with positive attitudes, not determined to let up or give up.

With teachers and select students, each team brought the heat every second of the game. Next up was the three point contest: A challenge to determine the most accurate and consistent shooters in the two Parker schools. Senior Walker Martin came out scorching, but Legend junior Dayne Pyfer stole the show. All of the athletes that competed did well.

Last but not least before the main event/ throwdown was the dunk contest. Most people can’t even dunk, but these high flyers matched up in the battle of creativity, flash, and flare. From the beginning, it was apparent that sophomore Joseph Dalton came prepared.   Multiple perfect scores of 50 secured the victory and the crowd was amazed at the 10th grader’s athleticism.

It is assumed at first that the staff game will be slow with inexperienced teachers trying to score even one basket, but this game was far from that expectation. As government teacher Ryan Finnefrock predicted: “There will be a plethora of talented individuals playing tonight... If everything goes as planned, hopefully chap will come out on top.” As both teams featured multiple former high school, college, and professional players, the level of play was at its peak. Lead by head varsity coach Tellus Truesdale’s deep shooting, assistant coach and former professional player Nate Rohnert’s shot creating, and Finnefrock’s energy, Chap secured the win.

Crosstown Throwdown is a great way to get athletes, students, and staff involved to prepare for the upcoming season that doesn't start too long afterwards. “Many of the Chaparral and Legend fans come out for the rivalry games, and this is an opportunity before the season to have a little fun,” said Johnson. This was a great show out for both schools at Chaparral, and both sides of the rivalry got a taste of what’s to come in the big game.

by Carson Frost,Erika Grotts, Chloe Heffernan

Photo by Carson Frost

Photo by Carson Frost

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Welcome To The Grind :The Daily Struggles and Triumphs of an Ultimate Frisbee Athlete

 

 

The sun rises in Parker, Colorado on a chilly fall morning at approximately 6:35 AM. Though it is seemingly just another morning before the school day at Chaparral High, this day is not typical for a select few. Senior Dylan Cann wakes up once a week on this day with a certain excitement, a certain buzz. It’s a normal Tuesday morning to everyone else, but to Cann, it is anything but. It’s the morning of the weekly Ultimate Frisbee meet, and he couldn’t be more excited.

 

To Cann, Ultimate Frisbee is not a simple hobby nor afternoon pastime. To him, it is a way of life, and he welcomes the Tuesday meet ahead of him, since he is, of course, an elite athlete, alongside the other athletic gems framed on the painted walls of the hallway. As a serious Ultimate Frisbee competitor, no day goes by as a normal one, and it seems as if every waking second is dedicated to the grind.  “My typical day consists of imagining the field I will be playing on the next Tuesday, dreaming of the nice weather that will be happening, looking back on good times with my teammates, and looking forward to good memories we will make on the field,” states Cann.

 

But, contrary to popular belief, Ultimate Frisbee requires a focused work rate and unparalleled dedication to the game. “Hydration is key the day of a big Ultimate Frisbee meetup, but also, you have to mentally prepare for this kind of thing, keep your nerves down, keep calm, and being confident is what it comes down to when you have the disc in your hand,” he remarks. Cann spends every Tuesday afternoon with that familiar disc in his hand, bearing the elements, building the camaraderie between him and his teammates, enjoying each time as if it were his last.

 

In saying that, so many hours on the grind has had a profound effect on Cann, and he relates it to a life-changing event.  “Before Ultimate Frisbee, I was just another shallow high school student, but after that first Tuesday I knew I had found my path in life. I will now carry a disc wherever I go because the sport has changed who I am as a person,” explains Cann.

 

Cann welcomes all of Chaparral to take part in this life-changing, infinitely-fun event. “I want everyone to know that Ultimate Frisbee is the coolest sport at Chaparral, and I say that with confidence. I think everybody should try it,” said Cann. So next time you are bored on a Tuesday afternoon, head out to Stonegate Park- it might just change your life.

By: Avree Martinez

Photo by: Ayla Main

Photo by: Ayla Main

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No Days Off

Chaparral athletes dedicate countless hours during the off season to transitioning new skills into the regular season. Time is of the essence when attempting to improve the mind and body to surpass goals set based off of past achievements. Many Chaparral athletes are trying to break barriers by putting in the work that goes unseen.

“I believe that there is always someone out there training to take your spot, so I try to improve my game any chance I get,” said senior Alec Ackerman.

    Each athlete trains in a workout style that will help them succeed individually. Track athlete Tad Trimarco trains by running, lifting, and core six times a week, and swimming twice a week. Tennis athlete Gabby Garcia trains by participating in private lessons and winter league. Lacrosse athlete Trevor Orndoff trains by weight lifting, practice during the week, and participates in games on the weekend (as well as playing club lacrosse throughout the year).

    “It’s important to always be training because you want to be able to keep your fitness and skills up. If you take too long of a break you could lose ability to perform to your full potential,” said senior Malak Rafik.

    The off season creates the foundation of a successful start of a new season. Chaparral athletes continue to push the limits to maintain greatness and strive for more success. As the off season progresses athletes gain more experience to become valued athlete. The result: a notable performance worth talking about.

Story by:Olivia Goodman

photo by Olivia Goodman 

photo by Olivia Goodman 

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